University Catalog 2019-2020 
    
    Mar 07, 2021  
University Catalog 2019-2020 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Addendum



Biological and Applied Health Sciences

Curriculum Update(s)

Biology with Dual Degree in Biomedical Engineering, B.S.

      PHIL 2040 Logic is being replaced with ENGR 2120 Circuits I.

Approved by Academic Council on 11/12/19.

Business

Course Deletion(s)

MGMT 4010S. Leadership Seminar. One of the key aspects of management is its focus on leadership. For centuries the concept of whether leaders are “born or made” has been a subject of debate. Students will be required to read between three to five current books on key management topics and they will be required to analyze the leadership concepts and impacts on the leader’s organization. Additionally, student will be required to read and analyze specific cases in leadership and to conduct a research term paper on a key topic in this area. Prerequisite(s): senior standing. (3, Sp)

Approved by Academic Council on 12/10/19

New Course(s)

MGMT 3180. Leadership for the 21st Century. This course gives students an applied and comprehensive view of the leadership experience in the 21st Century. It integrates recent ideas and applications with established research. It covers the history of leadership studies and the traditional theories, but goes beyond that to incorporate valuable ideas such as leadership and the “new science,” leadership vision, leading a learning organization, and shaping culture and values. It offers students significant potential for selfassessment, leadership development, and career exploration. Through a required partnership with XULA’s Career Services, students will identify internships in their selected pathway, create or update their resume, and conduct mock interviews to prepare them for the next steps in their path towards lifelong learning. Prerequisite(s):  Junior status required. (3)

Approved by Academic Council on 12/10/19

Fine Arts and Humanities

New Course(s)

ENGL 4125. A Woman Writer. (WMST 4125) A Woman Writer is intended to introduce students to the study of literature and feminist theory by a particular woman writer. Each semester the focus will be on one woman writer from any century whose work may include a single genre or several, including poetry, essays, short stories, novels, or plays. Prerequisite(s):  ENGL 1020. (3)

Approved by Academic Council on 10/31/19

HIST 3190. History of Scientific Thought. (XCOR 3020) This course examines how different cultures and individuals have thought about science from the ancient world to the present. Emphasis will be placed on the history of inquiry about the natural world, although technological developments or “applied science” will also be explored. Course topics include mathematics, astronomy, and natural philosophy in the ancient world, attitudes towards science in the Christian and Islamic Middle Ages, the early modern “Scientific Revolution,” and the rapid evolution of scientific ideas in recent centuries, especially in the realms of modern physics, cosmology, chemistry, and genetics. (3)

Approved by Academic Council on 10/31/19

PHIL 3050. Ethics at the End of Life. (DGHU 3080 and XCOR 3010) In this course, students will be asked to consider their own research interests in light of the goals and values of patients. End-of-life issues accomplish this task uniquely, because our ability to manage symptoms has far outpaced our ability to cure disease. How should we regard the wishes of patients who are chronically sick, slowly losing cognitive function, or even terminally ill? If the confrontation with one’s own mortality is, to a large degree, a personal issue, then how should we understand patient pain and suffering? While it is true that end-of life issues raise significant questions about the purpose and limits of scientific research, they also introduce equally important questions about what we can claim ethically about someone else’s confrontation with mortality. For this reason, students will be challenged to move beyond both dogmatic scientific claims and abstract ethical arguments. (3)

Approved by Academic Council on 10/31/19

ENGL 3450 Digital Literature. (DGHU 3450) Explores the transformative potential of digital technologies for reading, writing, and studying literature. Students in the course will examine theories, methods, and practices of digital literary studies as well as read digital literature. (3)

Approved by Academic Council on 11/21/19

ART xxxx. Pursuit of Innovation. (DGHU 2080) The Pursuit of Innovation course is a hybrid course, in which students learn through seminar and making, developing knowledge and skills in coding, robotics, creative software, and user experience design. (3)

Approved by Academic Council on 11/21/19

MUSH 1080. Introduction to World Music. This course is a survey of selected musical traditions from various areas of the globe and their respective cultural contexts. Music cultures surveyed will be selected from traditions of sub-Saharan Africa, Asia, Europe, North America, South America, and the Caribbean. (3)

Approved by Academic Council on 11/22/19

Updated Course(s)

HIST 4999. Senior Capstone. (0)

Presented as an informational item at the Academic Council meeting held on 10/22/19.

Mathematics and Physical Sciences

Curriculum Update(s)

Bioinformatics, B.S.

  1. The new CPSC introductory programming sequence is now reflected in the curriculum (i.e. CPSC 1724 (4), CPSC 2735 (5)).
  2. Chemistry courses will now begin in the first semester of the students’ sophomore year, allowing CPSC 2735 to be taken during Freshman year in the semester following CPSC 1724.
  3. MATH 1030 has been added to the curriculum.
  4. Organic Chemistry II has been removed from the curriculum.
  5. Senior capstone (BINF 4598-4599) is currently a 2 and 3 credit hour sequence and has been reduced to a 1 and 2 hour sequence respectively.
  6. Senior comprehensives (BINF 4999) have been added to the curriculum.
  7. BIOL 1230 counts toward the Scientifc Reasoning core requirement and not towards any major requirement.
  8. The Free/Minor elective requirement has been reduced to 15 hours from 20 hours. It’s recommended that bioinformatics majors take Organic Chemistry II and the associated drill.

Approved by Academic Council on 11/12/19.

 

Data Science, B.S.

  1. Replace CPSC 1710, CPSC 1720, and CPSC 2730 (9 total credit hours) with CPSC 1724 and CPSC 2735 (9 total credit hours), taken during freshman year.
  2. Move MATH 2030 to fall of sophomore year, STAT 3810 to spring of sophomore year, and STAT 4040 to spring of senior year.
  3. Move Creative Expression to fall of junior year and 3 credits of Minor / Free Electives from spring of senior year to fall of senior year.

Presented as an informational item at the Academic Council meeting held on 10/22/19.

 

Updated Course(s)

BINF 4598. Bioinformatics Capstone I. First semester of independent work by students under the guidance of a faculty member. This course will require students to choose a project that requires the implementation of bioinformatics software, pipelines, frameworks, or procedures to address important problems at the intersection of biology and computer science. For the first semester, the capstone course will focus on project selection, project design, and acquiring preliminary data/results. Prerequisite(s):  BINF 3500 (1)

Approved by Academic Council on 11/12/19.

BINF 4599. Bioinformatics Capstone II. Second semester of independent work by students under the guidance of a faculty member.  The focus will be on the continuation of the project from the first semester capstone course, along with its implementation and evaluation. Prerequisite(s):  BINF 4598 (2)

Approved by Academic Council on 11/12/19.

MATH 2040. Basic Statistics II. (STAT 2020) Hypothesis testing of population means, proportions, etc. Contingency tables, goodness-of-fit, analysis of variance, nonparametric statistics. Introduction of computer packages to analyze data. Prerequisite(s): Grade of “C” or better in MATH 1020 (or STAT 2010) or ECON 2070 or MATH 3010 (or STAT 3010). (4)

Presented as an informational item at the Academic Council meeting held on 11/12/19.

STAT 2020. Statistical Methods II. (MATH 2040) Hypothesis testing of population means, proportions, etc. Contingency tables, goodness-of-fit, analysis of variance, nonparametric statistics. Introduction of computer packages to analyze data. Prerequisite(s): Grade of “C” or higher in STAT 2010 (or MATH 1020) or ECON 2070 or STAT 3010 (or MATH 3010). (3)

Presented as an informational item at the Academic Council meeting held on 11/12/19.

New Course(s)

DTSC 2010. Explorations in Data Science for Humanities. (DGHU 2010) This application focused course will present basic data organization, data cleaning, data management, visualization and statistical modeling in digital humanities. This course lies at the intersection of fundamental programming skills, data visualization, data cleaning and statistical modeling in R and Excel environment. Furthermore, data cleaning is exercised using Excel and rest of the components of the course are handled on R platform.  Students will identify appropriate statistical methods for the data or problems and conduct their own analysis using real datasets. This is a hands-on, project-based course to enable students to develop skills and to solve interdisciplinary problems. Prerequisite(s):  CPSC 1710 and STAT 2010/MATH 1020 or permission of department head. (3)

Approved by Academic Council on 11/22/19

Update(s) to the requirements for Chemistry with a Dual Degree in Pharmacy, B.S.

In order to be eligible for the Dual Degree program, a student must maintain a 2.75 GPA in courses required for admission to the Doctor of Pharmacy program.  A grade of C or higher must be earned in all of these required courses and grades of C or higher must be earned in the specific College of Pharmacy courses that are counted towards the Bachelor’s Degree in Chemistry.

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Updated Course(s)

NSCI 4020. Cognitive Neuroscience. (PSYC 4020) Explores the neurobiological mechanisms that underlie cognition by understanding the brain. The primary objective is to introduce terminology and concepts that explain how cognitive function arises from interactions between groups of neurons. This course seeks to highlight the brain’s complexity and elegance, and its ability to create and coordinate all of a person’s thoughts, actions, memories, feelings, dreams, and aspirations. Prerequisite(s): PSYC 1010 and PSYC 3050. (3) 

Approved by Academic Council on 10/22/19

NSCI 4050. Drugs and Behavior. (PSYC 4050) Introduces students to the basics of drug administration, absorption, metabolism, and excretion, as well as how drugs act at neuronal synapses to cause changes in neuronal function. The connection is then made from these neuronal functional changes to broader behavioral changes associated with various legal, illegal, and prescription psychoactive drugs. Also examines the use of antidepressants, antipsychotics, and other drug therapies for the treatment of psychopathologies. Prerequisite(s): PSYC 1010, PSYC 2020, PSYC 2512 and PSYC 3050 or permission of the instructor. (3)

Approved by Academic Council on 10/22/19

NSCI 4085. Disorders of the Brain. (PSYC 4085) An introduction to the study of clinical neuropsychology, an applied area of neuroscience. Survey of current neuropsychological knowledge as it pertains to normal brain anatomy, functioning, and pathological disorders. Specific emphasis placed on current scientific literature regarding the use of neuroimaging and neuropsychological methods for understanding network-based brain changes that occur in neurological disorders. Prerequisite(s): PSYC 2512 and PSYC 3050 or permission of the instructor. (3)

Approved by Academic Council on 10/22/19

PSYC 4020. Cognitive Neuroscience. (NSCI 4020) Explores the neurobiological mechanisms that underlie cognition by understanding the brain. The primary objective is to introduce terminology and concepts that explain how cognitive function arises from interactions between groups of neurons. This course seeks to highlight the brain’s complexity and elegance, and its ability to create and coordinate all of a person’s thoughts, actions, memories, feelings, dreams, and aspirations. Prerequisite(s): PSYC 1010 and PSYC 3050. (3) 

Approved by Academic Council on 10/22/19

PSYC 4050. Drugs and Behavior. (NSCI 4050) Introduces students to the basics of drug administration, absorption, metabolism, and excretion, as well as how drugs act at neuronal synapses to cause changes in neuronal function. The connection is then made from these neuronal functional changes to broader behavioral changes associated with various legal, illegal, and prescription psychoactive drugs. Also examines the use of antidepressants, antipsychotics, and other drug therapies for the treatment of psychopathologies. Prerequisite(s): PSYC 1010, PSYC 2020, PSYC 2512, and PSYC 3050 or permission of the instructor. (3)

Approved by Academic Council on 10/22/19

PSYC 4085. Disorders of the Brain. (NSCI 4085) An introduction to the study of clinical neuropsychology, an applied area of neuroscience. Survey of current neuropsychological knowledge as it pertains to normal brain anatomy, functioning, and pathological disorders. Specific emphasis placed on current scientific literature regarding the use of neuroimaging and neuropsychological methods for understanding network-based brain changes that occur in neurological disorders. Prerequisites: PSYC 2512 and PSYC 3050 or permission of the instructor. (3)

Approved by Academic Council on 10/22/19

SOCI 4950. Senior Capstone Internship. Senior Capstone requires majors to apply what they’ve learned through the program by combining a student internship with class sessions that guide students through the process of creating a research proposal based on the work they are doing at their internship site. Additionally, this class will prepare students for life after graduation with workshops covering academic and professional pursuits, interpersonal relationships, financial literacy, and other relevant topics related to the transition from college student to college graduate. Prerequisite(s): Senior Status as a Sociology major and internship approved by start of the semester. (3)

Approved by Academic Council on 10/22/19

SOCI 2060. Race and Ethnic Relations. (AADS 2060) This course is concerned with examining issues, problems, and research findings on race, ethnic, and minority group relations. Emphasis is on U.S. Black-White relations, American ethnic groups, religious conflict, and racial and ethnic group contacts in Europe, Asia, Africa, and Latin America. (3, EXPLORATIONS/African American Heritage & Legacies)

Approved by Academic Council on 10/22/19

SOCI 3025. African American Urban Life. (AADS 3025) This interdisciplinary course examines African Americans as agents in shaping the urban experience in the United States. The central focus of the course will be the development of cultural, social, religious, economic, educational and political institutions. Examples will be drawn from among communities such as Harlem, NY, the Central Avenue district of Los Angeles, Chicago’s south side, and the Auburn Avenue district of Atlanta, as well as others. Prerequisite(s): Any 1000 level sociology course. (3, EXPLORATIONS/African American Heritage & Legacies)

Approved by Academic Council on 10/22/19

SOCI 1011 Global Social Change is now SOCI 3011 Global Social Change. It’s also cross-listed with XCOR 3020. The following course description remains the same:

This course offers students the opportunity to develop a sociological understanding of what it means to live in a global society. Theories about global social and economic interconnections, including sociological theories of globalization, are used to examine how social structures, social institutions, and social change are experienced differently throughout the world. Special emphasis is placed on inequalities engendered by globalization and global social change, including unequal power relationships among social groups, social classes, and regions throughout the world. (3)

Approved by Academic Council on 10/31/19

PSCI 4999. Political Science Senior Capstone Experience. The Political Science Department designed the Capstone Seminar to be a culminating experience for students. As majors, you complete a common set of courses early in your program of study that establishes the foundation of the discipline and initiates processes of skill building. You then branch off into different subfields (American National Institutions, International Affairs, Public-Law, Urban Politics, Public Administration) and take a variety of courses with different substantive and skill emphases in the “middle” of the major. The Capstone provides a venue where you will be able (and expected) to draw upon the ideas and skills you have gained thus far to explore a new and overarching topic or set of related topics in Political Science that has relevance to your futures. Capstone seminars provide an integrative experience that substantively allows you to employ insights and ideas from work in different subfields and includes skill intensive writing, critical thinking, independent research and oral presentation opportunities to apply theories and concepts to new problems and cases, as well as practice in articulating and defending your own views. Prerequisite(s):  Students must complete all required courses in the discipline to register for the course. (0)

Approved by Academic Council on 12/10/19

Interdisciplinary

New Course(s)

DGHU 2000. Topics in Social Justice for the Humanities. This course is designed to help students explore and understand different forms of economic injustice across, using data sets from education, business, and the sciences. Students will be expected to use Excel to curate, store, and manage our data. Passing developmental math is a prerequisite for the course, and the course does not count for major or minor credit in the business degree program. (3)

Approved by Academic Council on 11/12/19.

DGHU 3080. Ethics at the End of Life. (PHIL 3050 and XCOR 3010)In this course, students will be asked to consider their own research interests in light of the goals and values of patients. End-of-life issues accomplish this task uniquely, because our ability to manage symptoms has far outpaced our ability to cure disease. How should we regard the wishes of patients who are chronically sick, slowly losing cognitive function, or even terminally ill? If the confrontation with one’s own mortality is, to a large degree, a personal issue, then how should we understand patient pain and suffering? While it is true that end-of life issues raise significant questions about the purpose and limits of scientific research, they also introduce equally important questions about what we can claim ethically about someone else’s confrontation with mortality. For this reason, students will be challenged to move beyond both dogmatic scientific claims and abstract ethical arguments. They will also be tasked with learning some digital tools (e.g. Wordpress, Omeka, or Tableau) that they can use to present and publish their semester-long research projects in a database of student work on Bioethics. This includes becoming proficient in the ethics of digital publishing and in strategies for developing a scholarly portfolio. (3)

Approved by Academic Council on 11/12/19.

DGHU 3030. Civil Rights Movement in the United States. (HIST 3385, AADS 3385, and XCOR 3010) Examines the major civil rights campaigns that took place throughout the U.S. from 1950 to1975. Focuses on strategies, objectives, successes and failures of civil rights leaders and organizations. Special emphasis on civil rights protests and movements in New Orleans and throughout Louisiana. Fulfills history major requirement for three upper-level credits of African American History. Prerequisite: 3 credits of HIST. (3, EXPLORATIONS/African American Heritage and Legacies)

Approved by Academic Council on 11/12/19.

DGHU 3040. Digital Narratives of Resistance and Black Joy. Media representations of black people and black culture are often distorted and overwhelmingly negative. This course examines the ways in which black people experience joy to resist, challenge and in some ways, protest the negative stereotypes and perceptions of black culture. Students will survey Africana (African & African Diaspora) artistic traditions including: visual culture, dance, film, music and comedy to understand the diverse ways in which “joy” is experienced and communicated. Using digital tools, students will create a podcast documenting the narratives of joy as resistance. Students will proffer counter narratives to advocate for intersectional equity in black representation which celebrates the fullness of black identity, and celebrates black experiences across race, gender identity, class and ability. As our final project, we will produce a live show, exploring how multimedia elements can complement audio storytelling, and how the presence of audience can inform the creation of compelling narrative. (3)

Approved by Academic Council on 11/12/19.

DGHU 4000. Special Topics in Digital Humanities. This course allows for an exploration of a narrow field of digital humanities inquiry. Topics vary by semester according to faculty and student interest and can be repeated for credit. Prerequisite(s): 3 semester hours in digital humanities. (3)

Approved by Academic Council on 11/12/19.

WMST 4125. A Woman Writer. (ENGL 4125) A Woman Writer is intended to introduce students to the study of literature and feminist theory by a particular woman writer. Each semester the focus will be on one woman writer from any century whose work may include a single genre or several, including poetry, essays, short stories, novels, or plays. Prerequisite(s):  ENGL 1020. (3)

Approved by Academic Council on 10/31/19

DGHU 3450. Digital Literature. (ENGL 3450) Explores the transformative potential of digital technologies for reading, writing, and studying literature. Students in the course will examine theories, methods, and practices of digital literary studies as well as read digital literature. (3)

Approved by Academic Council on 11/21/19

DGHU 2080. Pursuit of Innovation. (ART xxxx) The Pursuit of Innovation course is a hybrid course, in which students learn through seminar and making, developing knowledge and skills in coding, robotics, creative software, and user experience design. (3)

Approved by Academic Council on 11/21/19

DGHU 2010. Explorations in Data Science for Humanities. (DTSC 2010) This application focused course will present basic data organization, data cleaning, data management, visualization and statistical modeling in digital humanities. This course lies at the intersection of fundamental programming skills, data visualization, data cleaning and statistical modeling in R and Excel environment. Furthermore, data cleaning is exercised using Excel and rest of the components of the course are handled on R platform.  Students will identify appropriate statistical methods for the data or problems and conduct their own analysis using real datasets. This is a hands-on, project-based course to enable students to develop skills and to solve interdisciplinary problems. Prerequisite(s):  CPSC 1710 and STAT 2010/MATH 1020 or permission of department head. (3)

Approved by Academic Council on 11/22/19

 

Updated Course(s)

AADS 2060. Race and Ethnic Relations. (SOCI 2060) This course is concerned with examining issues, problems, and research findings on race, ethnic, and minority group relations. Emphasis is on U.S. Black-White relations, American ethnic groups, religious conflict, and racial and ethnic group contacts in Europe, Asia, Africa, and Latin America. (3, EXPLORATIONS/African American Heritage & Legacies)

Approved by Academic Council on 10/22/19

AADS 3025. African American Urban Life. (SOCI 3025) This interdisciplinary course examines African Americans as agents in shaping the urban experience in the United States. The central focus of the course will be the development of cultural, social, religious, economic, educational and political institutions. Examples will be drawn from among communities such as Harlem, NY, the Central Avenue district of Los Angeles, Chicago’s south side, and the Auburn Avenue district of Atlanta, as well as others. Prerequisite(s): Any 1000 level sociology course. (3, EXPLORATIONS/African American Heritage & Legacies)

Approved by Academic Council on 10/22/19

Xavier Core

Updated XCOR offerings

XCOR 3010:

PHIL 3050. Ethics at the End of Life. (XCOR 3010) In this course, students will be asked to consider their own research interests in light of the goals and values of patients. End-of-life issues accomplish this task uniquely, because our ability to manage symptoms has far outpaced our ability to cure disease. How should we regard the wishes of patients who are chronically sick, slowly losing cognitive function, or even terminally ill? If the confrontation with one’s own mortality is, to a large degree, a personal issue, then how should we understand patient pain and suffering? While it is true that end-of life issues raise significant questions about the purpose and limits of scientific research, they also introduce equally important questions about what we can claim ethically about someone else’s confrontation with mortality. For this reason, students will be challenged to move beyond both dogmatic scientific claims and abstract ethical arguments. (3)

Approved by Academic Council on 10/31/19

XCOR 3020:

HIST 3190. History of Scientific Thought. This course examines how different cultures and individuals have thought about science from the ancient world to the present. Emphasis will be placed on the history of inquiry about the natural world, although technological developments or “applied science” will also be explored. Course topics include mathematics, astronomy, and natural philosophy in the ancient world, attitudes towards science in the Christian and Islamic Middle Ages, the early modern “Scientific Revolution,” and the rapid evolution of scientific ideas in recent centuries, especially in the realms of modern physics, cosmology, chemistry, and genetics. (3)

Approved by Academic Council on 10/31/19

SOCI 3011. Global Social Change. This course offers students the opportunity to develop a sociological understanding of what it means to live in a global society. Theories about global social and economic interconnections, including sociological theories of globalization, are used to examine how social structures, social institutions, and social change are experienced differently throughout the world. Special emphasis is placed on inequalities engendered by globalization and global social change, including unequal power relationships among social groups, social classes, and regions throughout the world. (3)

Approved by Academic Council on 10/31/19

College of Pharmacy

New Program(s)

Master of Health Science in Physician Assistant Studies, MHS-PAS

The Physicians Assistant program is a 28-month master’s degree program that has a 12-consecutive month didactic phase and 16 month clinical phase.  In the spirit of academic excellence, the mission of the Xavier University Physician Assistant Program is to educate physician assistants to become ethical, competent, and compassionate physician assistants who are dedicated to providing superior quality healthcare that contributes to the promotion of a more just and humane society by improving the healthcare of the diverse communities we serve.

First Year
Spring Semester

  • PHAS 5011 -  Basic Science I
  • PHAS 5021 - Clinical Medicine I
  • PHAS 5041 - Pharmacotherapeutics I
  • PHAS 5051- Patient Assessment I
  • PHAS 5061 - The Patient and the PA I
  • PHAS 5071 - PA Professional Practice
  • PHAS 5081- Community Outreach Project I

 Semester Hours: 15

Summer Semester

  • PHAS 5012 -  Basic Science II
  • PHAS 5022 - Clinical Medicine II
  • PHAS 5031 - Clinical Laboratory Medicine I
  • PHAS 5042 - Pharmacotherapeutics II
  • PHAS 5052- Patient Assessment II
  • PHAS 5062 - The Patient and the PA II
  • PHAS 5072 - Medical Informatics
  • PHAS 5082- Community Outreach Project II

Semester Hours: 17

Fall Semester

  • PHAS 5013 -  Basic Science III
  • PHAS 5023 - Clinical Medicine III
  • PHAS 5032 - Clinical Laboratory Medicine II
  • PHAS 5043 - Pharmacotherapeutics III
  • PHAS 5053- Patient Assessment III
  • PHAS 5063 - Intercultural Communications
  • PHAS 5093 - Clinical Integration
  • PHAS 5221 - Interprofessional Experience
  • PHAS 5083- Community Outreach Project III

Semester Hours: 18

Second Year

Spring Semester

  • PHAS 5111 - Supervised Practice- Family Medicine
  • PHAS 5121 - Supervised Practice- Internal Medicine
  • PHAS 5131 - Supervised Practice- Pediatrics

Semester Hours: 12

Summer Semester

  • PHAS 5041- Supervised Practice - General Surgery
  • PHAS 5151- Supervised Practice- Emergency Medicine
  • PHAS 5161 - Supervised Practice- Behavioral Health

 Semester Hours: 12

Fall Semester

  • PHAS 5171 -  Supervised Practice- Women’s Health
  • PHAS 5181 - Supervised Practice- Elective
  • PHAS 5191 - Supervised Practice - Elective

Semester Hours: 12

Third Year

Spring Semester

  • PHAS 5211 - PA Externship Elective I
  • PHAS 5212 - PA Externship Elective II
  • PHAS 5231 - Summative Course
  • PHAS 5251 - Capstone Project

Semester Hours: 9

Total Hours: 95

New Course(s)

The Fall (Fa), Spring (Sp), or Summer (Su) sessions indicated are expected but are not guaranteed.

PHAS 5011 Basic Science I. This is the first in a series of courses designed to develop an understanding of normal physiology, genetics, pathologic, and pathophysiologic concepts of diseases per organ system, and clinical anatomy with an emphasis on important anatomical landmarks required in physical evaluation of patients, anatomical relationships of structures to each other, and anatomical components of body systems. Sequence aligns with the clinical medicine organ system.  Prerequisite: Admission to the physician assistant program (2, Sp)

PHAS 5012 Basic Science II. This is the second in a series of courses designed to develop an understanding of normal physiology, genetics, pathologic, and pathophysiologic concepts of diseases per organ system, and clinical anatomy with an emphasis on important anatomical landmarks required in physical evaluation of patients, anatomical relationships of structures to each other, and anatomical components of body systems. Sequence aligns with the clinical medicine organ system.  Prerequisite: Successful completion of PHAS 5011 Basic Science I with a grade of a C or better. (2, Su)

PHAS 5013  Basic Science III. This is the third in a series of courses designed to develop an understanding of normal physiology, genetics, pathologic, and pathophysiologic concepts of diseases per organ system, and clinical anatomy with an emphasis on important anatomical landmarks required in physical evaluation of patients, anatomical relationships of structures to each other, and anatomical components of body systems. Sequence aligns with the clinical medicine organ system.  Prerequisite: Successful completion of PA 5012 Basic Science II with a grade of a C or better. (2, Fa)

PHAS 5021 Clinical Medicine I. This is the first in a series of courses designed to provide an intensive study of human diseases and disorders, using a lifespan approach from pediatrics to geriatrics, in the areas of clinical medicine including epidemiology, etiology, historical data, clinical manifestations, progression, therapeutic management, prevention, laboratory medicine and prognosis. This course will be facilitated through lecture and problem-based learning.  Prerequisite: Admission to the physician assistant program. (5, Sp)

PHAS 5022  Clinical Medicine II. This is the second in a series of courses designed to provide an intensive study of human diseases and disorders, using a lifespan approach from pediatrics to geriatrics, in the areas of clinical medicine including epidemiology, etiology, historical data, clinical manifestations, progression, therapeutic management, prevention, laboratory medicine and prognosis. This course will be facilitated through lecture and problem-based learning.  Prerequisite: Successful completion of PHAS 5021 Clinical Medicine I with a grade of a C or better.  (6, Su)

PHAS 5023  Clinical Medicine III. This is the third in a series of courses designed to provide an intensive study of human diseases and disorders, using a lifespan approach from pediatrics to geriatrics, in the areas of clinical medicine including epidemiology, etiology, historical data, clinical manifestations, progression, therapeutic management, prevention, laboratory medicine and prognosis. This course will be facilitated through lecture and problem-based learning.  Prerequisite: Successful completion of PHAS 5022 Clinical Medicine II with a grade of a C or better.  (5, Fa)

PHAS 5031  Clinical Laboratory Medicine I.This is the first in a series of courses designed to develop a functional understanding of the appropriate uses and interpretations of clinical diagnostic testing, including radiographic and EKG testing. Students will learn to select, interpret and evaluate clinical laboratory, imaging and other diagnostic tests used for diagnosing, treating and managing patient needs.  Prerequisites: Admission to the physician assistant program. (1, Su)

PHAS 5032  Clinical Laboratory Medicine II. This is the second in a series of courses designed to develop a functional understanding of the appropriate uses and interpretations of clinical diagnostic testing, including radiographic testing. Students will learn to select, interpret and evaluate clinical laboratory, imaging and other diagnostic tests used for diagnosing, treating and managing patient needs.  Prerequisites: Successful completion of PHAS 5031 Clinical Laboratory Medicine I with a grade of a C or better.  (1, Fa)

PHAS 5041  Pharmacotherapeutics I. This is the first in a series of courses designed to develop skills related to the principles of pharmacology as they pertain to therapeutic agents, prescription and non-prescription. Discussion will include the principal mechanisms of action of the major classes of therapeutic agents, understanding of pharmacodynamics, uses, side effects, toxicities, compliance, monitoring parameters, drug interaction, and cost. A rational and evidence based approach to the selection of medications to be prescribed, and studies of medications used in the treatment of acute and chronic illnesses across the lifespan will be presented.  Prerequisites: Admission to the physician assistant program. (3, Sp)

PHAS 5042  Pharmacotherapeutics II. This is the second in a series of courses designed to develop skills related to the principles of pharmacology as they pertain to therapeutic agents, prescription and non-prescription. Discussion will include the principal mechanisms of action of the major classes of therapeutic agents, understanding of pharmacodynamics, uses, side effects and toxicities. A rational and evidence based approach to the selection of medications to be prescribed, and studies of medications used in the treatment of acute and chronic illnesses across the lifespan will be presented.  Prerequisites: Successful completion of PHAS 5041 Pharmacotherapeutics I with a grade of a C or better.  (3, Su)

PHAS 5043  Pharmacotherapeutics III. This is the third in a series of courses designed to develop skills related to the principles of pharmacology as they pertain to therapeutic agents, prescription and non-prescription. Discussion will include the principal mechanisms of action of the major classes of therapeutic agents, understanding of pharmacodynamics, uses, side effects and toxicities. A rational and evidence based approach to the selection of medications to be prescribed, and studies of medications used in the treatment of acute and chronic illnesses across the lifespan will be presented.  Prerequisites: Successful completion of PHAS 5042 Pharmacotherapeutics II with a grade of a C or better.  (3, Fa)

PHAS 5051 Patient Assessment I. This is the first in a series of courses designed to develop the knowledge and skills required to obtain and record the complete medical history, use of appropriate equipment, proper techniques and accurate medical terminology to document findings; course will provide an overview of the medical record as well as development of writing and organizational skills for medical record keeping and oral presentation skills. Skills will be developed through structured laboratory exercises.  Prerequisites: Admission to the physician assistant program. (3, Sp)

PHAS 5052  Patient Assessment II. This is the second in a series of courses designed to develop the knowledge and skills required to obtain and record the complete medical history, use of appropriate equipment, proper techniques and accurate medical terminology to document findings; course will provide an overview of the medical record as well as development of writing and organizational skills for medical record keeping and oral presentation skills. Skills will be developed through structured laboratory exercises.  Prerequisites: Successful completion of PHAS 5051 Patient Assessment I with a grade of a C or better.  (3, Su)

PHAS 5053 Patient Assessment III. This is the third in a series of courses designed to develop the knowledge and skills required to obtain and record the complete medical history, use of appropriate equipment, proper techniques and accurate medical terminology to document findings; course will provide an overview of the medical record as well as development of writing and organizational skills for medical record keeping and oral presentation skills. Skills will be developed through structured laboratory exercises.  Prerequisites: Successful completion of PHAS 5052 Patient Assessment II with a grade of a C or better.  (3, Fa)

PHAS 5061 The Patient and the PA I. This is the first in a series of courses designed to develop skills in the area of patient communication, patient counseling, patient education and cultural diversity and how they influence all aspects of medical practice. Instruction is focused on the detection and application of preventive measures and treatment of health risk behaviors including stress, abuse and violence, substance abuse, sexuality, end-of-life issues and reaction to illness. The course will also have discussions on medical ethics to include confidentiality, truth telling, competency, making informed decisions and other ethical issues.  Prerequisites: Admission to the physician assistant program.  (1, Sp)

PHAS 5062 The Patient and the PA II. This is the second in a series of courses designed to develop skills in the area of patient communication, patient counseling, patient education and cultural diversity and how they influence all aspects of medical practice. Instruction is focused on the detection and application of preventive measures and treatment of health risk behaviors including stress, abuse and violence, substance abuse, sexuality, end-of-life issues and reaction to illness. The course will also have discussions on medical ethics to include confidentiality, truth telling, competency, making informed decisions and other ethical issues. Prerequisites: Successful completion of PHAS 5061 The Patient and the PA I with a grade of a C or better.  (1, Su)

PHAS 5063 Intercultural Communications. This course is designed to familiarize students with basic concepts, approaches, processes, and contexts, which form the foundation for critical discussion of cross-cultural interaction.  Prerequisites: Successful completion of PHAS 5061 and PHAS 5062 The Patient and the PA I and II with a grade of a C or better.  (1, Fa)

PHAS 5071 PA Professional Practice. This course is designed to aid the student in the transition into the medical profession and serves as an introduction to professional practice issues. Areas of discussion include history of the physician assistant profession, the PA-Physician team, professional organizations, licensing and credentialing, malpractice, professionalism, healthcare delivery, reimbursement issues including Medicaid and Medicare, health literacy, diversity issues, domestic violence and end of life issues.  Prerequisites: Admission to the physician assistant program.  (1, Sp)

PHAS 5072 Medical Informatics. This course will cover the importance of evidence-based medicine and review basic statistical, research methods and ethical standards in research. It will also cover the interpretation and application of various types of clinical articles to answering a clinical question and prepare the student for the project to be completed during the clinical year.  Prerequisites: Admission to the physician assistant program and completion of prior semester’s coursework with a grade of a C or better. (1, Su)

PHAS 5081 Community Outreach Project I. This is the first in a series of courses designed to support several aspects of our mission to promote a more just and humane while providing service to the medically underserved in the form of an educational presentation to a community group. Students select a topic of interest for health promotion/disease prevention to present to the target group to improve health outcomes.  Prerequisites: Admission to the physician assistant program. (0, Sp)

PHAS 5082 Community Outreach Project II. This is the second in a series of courses designed to support several aspects of our mission to promote a more just and humane while providing service to the medically underserved in the form of an educational presentation to a community group. Students select a topic of interest for health promotion/disease prevention to present to the target group to improve health outcomes.  Prerequisites: Completion of PHAS 5081 Community Outreach Project I with a Pass. (0, Su)

PHAS 5083 Community Outreach Project III. This is the third in a series of courses designed to support several aspects of our mission to promote a more just and humane while providing service to the medically underserved in the form of an educational presentation to a community group. Students select a topic of interest for health promotion/disease prevention to present to the target group to improve health outcomes.  Prerequisites: Completion of PHAS 5082 Community Outreach Project II with a Pass.  (0, Fa)

PHAS 5093 Clinical Integration. This course will prepare the student for the upcoming clinical year. The focus will be on procedures, such as bedside and surgical procedures including aseptic technique, air and blood-borne pathogen transmission prevention, phlebotomy, IV placement, foley catheter insertion, lumbar puncture, injections, surgical techniques and casting, as well as on the emergency management of a wide variety of diseases and disorders.  Prerequisites: Completion of prior semester’s coursework with a grade of a C or better. (2, Fa)

PHAS 5111 Supervised Practice-Family Medicine. This 4 week clinical course will be within a Family Medicine clinic setting. Students in this course will be able to refine their skills in performing a history and physical exam, ordering and interpreting diagnostic tests and developing treatment plans for patients. This course provides the PA student with experience in the outpatient evaluation and treatment of pediatric and adult patients, including preventive medicine, acute and chronic illness, and patient education.  Prerequisite: Successful completion or remediation of all didactic coursework with a grade of a C, a cumulative GPA of a 3.0 or higher, and successful completion or accommodation for deficiencies for all prior SCPEs required for all rotations. (4, Sp, Su, Fa)

PHAS 5121 Supervised Practice-Internal Medicine. This 4 week clinical course will be within an Internal Medicine practice. It will include a substantial inpatient experience for the PA student to gain knowledge of the evaluation and treatment of the multiple diseases and conditions of the adult and geriatric population requiring hospitalization. Students will perform history and physical examinations, obtain diagnostic testing and present their data along with proposed differential diagnoses and treatment plans.  Prerequisite: Successful completion or remediation of all didactic coursework with a grade of a C, a cumulative GPA of a 3.0 or higher, and successful completion or accommodation for deficiencies for all prior SCPEs required for all rotations. (4, Sp, Su, Fa)

PHAS 5131 Supervised Practice-Pediatrics. This 4 week clinical course will provide the PA student with experience in outpatient and/or in-patient management of pediatric patients. The student will have the opportunity to perform well child exams, problem oriented exams, evaluate common pediatric illnesses, and the care of the newborn, infants, children, and adolescents. Prerequisite: Successful completion or remediation of all didactic coursework with a grade of a C, a cumulative GPA of a 3.0 or higher, and successful completion or accommodation for deficiencies for all prior SCPEs required for all rotations. (4, Sp, Su, Fa)

PHAS 5141 Supervised Practice-General Surgery. This 4 week clinical course will be within a surgical practice. PA students will participate in Operating Room (OR) cases and hospital consultations as well as clinic based cases and visits in caring for conditions that require surgical management. This will include pre-operative, intra-operative, and post- operative care.  Prerequisite: Successful completion or remediation of all didactic coursework with a grade of a C, a cumulative GPA of a 3.0 or higher, and successful completion or accommodation for deficiencies for all prior SCPEs required for all rotations. (4, Sp, Su, Fa)

PHAS 5151 Supervised Practice-Emergency Medicine. This 4 week clinical course will be within a hospital Emergency Department. PA students will gain knowledge and learn skills relevant to the triage, stabilization, diagnosis, and management of acute, life- threatening injuries and illnesses as well as the care of less threatening conditions.  Prerequisite: Successful completion or remediation of all didactic coursework with a grade of a C, a cumulative GPA of a 3.0 or higher, and successful completion or accommodation for deficiencies for all prior SCPEs required for all rotations. (4, Sp, Su, Fa)

PHAS 5161 Supervised Practice-Behavioral Health. This 4 week clinical course will provide the PA student with a behavioral medicine experience in caring for ambulatory and/or hospitalized patients with psychiatric disorders. The student will perform basic psychiatric evaluations, monitor medications, and support the clinical management plan for patients after psychiatric evaluation and treatment.  Prerequisite: Successful completion or remediation of all didactic coursework with a grade of a C, a cumulative GPA of a 3.0 or higher, and successful completion or accommodation for deficiencies for all prior SCPEs required for all rotations. (4, Sp, Su, Fa)

PHAS 5171 Supervised Practice-Women’s Health. This 4 week clinical course provides the PA student with experience in managing common gynecologic disorders. Emphasis is placed on learning experiences in family planning and birth control, the recognition and treatment of sexually transmitted infections, cancer detection and prevention, prenatal care and the evaluation and treatment of common ambulatory gynecologic problems. The obstetric experience will include routine prenatal and postpartum care. It will include labor & delivery when possible.  Prerequisite: Successful completion or remediation of all didactic coursework with a grade of a C, a cumulative GPA of a 3.0 or higher, and successful completion or accommodation for deficiencies for all prior SCPEs required for all rotations. (4, Sp, Su, Fa)

PHAS 5181 Supervised Practice-Elective. This 4 week clinical course is intended to provide the student with supervised experiential training in an area that he/she might have a special interest in but was unable to experience during other clinical rotations.  Prerequisite: Successful completion or remediation of all didactic coursework with a grade of a C, a cumulative GPA of a 3.0 or higher, and successful completion or accommodation for deficiencies for all prior SCPEs required for all rotations. (4, Sp, Su, Fa)

PHAS 5191 Supervised Practice-Elective. This 4 week clinical course is intended to provide the student with supervised experiential training in an area that he/she might have a special interest in but was unable to experience during other clinical rotations.  Prerequisite: Successful completion or remediation of all didactic coursework with a grade of a C, a cumulative GPA of a 3.0 or higher, and successful completion or accommodation for deficiencies for all prior SCPEs required for all rotations. (4, Sp, Su, Fa)

PHAS 5211 PA Externship Elective I. This 4 week clinical course is intended to provide the student with more advanced supervised experiential training in an area that he/she might have a special interest in or in an area that a student may be assessed by a preceptor for the possibility of employment.  Prerequisite: Successful completion or remediation of all didactic coursework with a grade of a C, a cumulative GPA of a 3.0 or higher, and successful completion or accommodation for deficiencies for all prior SCPEs required for all rotations.  (3, Sp)

PHAS 5212 PA Externship Elective II. This 4 week clinical course is intended to provide the student with more advanced supervised experiential training in an area that he/she might have a special interest in or in an area that a student may be assessed by a preceptor for the possibility of employment.  Prerequisite: Successful completion or remediation of all didactic coursework with a grade of a C, a cumulative GPA of a 3.0 or higher, and successful completion or accommodation for deficiencies for all prior SCPEs required for all rotations. (3, Sp)

PHAS 5221 Inter-professional Experience. This course is designed to prepare clinical PA students to work collaboratively in interprofessional patient centered teams. It provides students with an experience to learn the principles of interprofessional practice and apply these principles by directly communicating with other health care professionals of different disciplines beyond the traditional physician -PA team.  Prerequisite: Successful completion or remediation of all didactic coursework with a grade of a C, a cumulative GPA of a 3.0 or higher, and successful completion or accommodation for deficiencies for all prior SCPEs required for all rotations.  (1, Fa)

PHAS 5231 Summative Course. Students must demonstrate competency to practice medicine as an entry level PA. This course allows the student to demonstrate the knowledge, interpersonal skills, patient care skills, and professionalism required to enter clinical practice.  Prerequisite: Successful completion or remediation of all didactic coursework with a grade of a C, a cumulative GPA of a 3.0 or higher, and successful completion or accommodation for deficiencies for all prior SCPEs required for all rotations.  (2, Sp)

PHAS 5241 Capstone Project. This course is a follow up to Medical Informatics. It is designed to allow the PA student to complete a Master’s Project under the guidance of a faculty advisor. Students may identify an area of medicine, disease process or condition, conduct research, and produce a paper worthy of publication. The student may also perform a learning service project resulting in a paper worthy of publication or product for use in the community. The student will prepare and present an oral presentation on their topic.  Prerequisite: Successful completion of Medical Informatics with a grade of a C or better.  (1, Sp)