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Xavier University of Louisiana    
 
    
 
  Nov 21, 2017
 
University Catalog 2016-2017 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Addendum




Certificate Program(s)

Health Communications

The curriculum consists of four courses totaling 12 credit hours. Three of four courses are offered online which include both required courses. The remaining course is offered in a traditional face-to-face format.Students can complete the program in a total of 6-9 months.

 

Curriculum
Communication Studies Public Health Sciences
Required Courses (6 hours)
CMST 1080 Health Communication   PHLT 1001 Introduction to Public Health  
Elective Courses (3 hours) Elective Courses (3 hours)
CMST 1400 Interpersonal Communication   PHLT 2002 Health Promotion Program Planning  
CMST 1500 Intercultural Communication   PHLT 2004 Introduction to Environmental Health  
CMST 3030 Race, Culture and Communication   PHLT 4002 Introduction to Global Health  
CMST 3040 Small Group Communication   PHLT 4003 Senior Seminar Case Studies  

   

Approved by Academic Council on 1/31/17                                                     

Entrepreneurship

The curriculum consists of 15 credit hours.The plan is for students to take 6 credits in Summer Session I, 6 credits in Summer Session II and the final 3 credits during fall semester.All four courses during summer sessions will be offered online and the fifth course may be offered online or in traditional face-to-face format in the fall semester.

Students earn a certification in Entrepreneurship by completing the required courses.  A student can earn a certification in Entrepreneurship (15 credit hours) in a period of six to nine months.

 

Curriculum
Required Courses (15 hours)
ENTR 1020 Introduction to Entrepreneurship  
MGMT 2060 Principles of Management  
SMKT 2050 Principles of Marketing  
ENTR 3021 Financial Management for Entrepreneurs  
ENTR 3780 Organization and Operation of a Small Business  

 

Approved by Academic Council on 1/31/17

Expansive Core Course(s)

The following course(s) were approved as expansive core courses:

MSCM 3400 Design for Digital Media
   Approved by Academic Council on 1/31/17

PHIL 1040 The Meaning of Life
   Approved by Academic Council on 3/28/17

PHIL 1050 The Quest for Knowledge
   Approved by Academic Council on 3/28/17

The following course(s) are no longer considered expansive core courses:

MSCM 1200 Principles of Visual Media  
   Approved by Academic Council on 1/31/17

Policy Update(s)

Academic Forgiveness

Academic Forgiveness is an umbrella term for a menu of policies (six total) meant to aid students in achieving academic success. These policies will aid students in achieving timely graduation by encouraging responsible behavior while also accounting for common mistakes as well as unavoidable circumstances and hardships.


These policies range from affecting four semesters of coursework to affecting only one course. There are three tiers of policies. Listed from most expansive to least, the tiers are:


Tier 1: Academic Renewal (covers up to 4 semesters)
Tier 2: Academic Reprieve (covers 1 semester); Curriculum Change Clemency (covers 1-2 semesters)
Tier 3: Course Repeat/Delete; Course Retake; Pass/Fail (each covers one course)


Xavier University of Louisiana Academic Renewal Policy
The purpose of Academic Renewal is to aid students in achieving timely graduation by disregarding up to four semesters of a student’s previously recorded poor academic performance when such work does not reflect current abilities or work ethic. As a consequence, Academic Renewal allows students to benefit from their current level of ability without being permanently penalized by past substandard performance. Additionally, Academic Renewal is meant to encourage students to continue their educational efforts at Xavier when the impact of previously-earned low grades on the cumulative GPA would otherwise make success unlikely.


A student may request Academic Renewal at Xavier consistent with these guidelines:


1. Academic Renewal is intended to facilitate timely graduation from Xavier University, which requires a GPA of 2.0. Therefore, it is available for students with a cumulative GPA below 2.0. It is not a vehicle for students who want to raise a grade point average already above 2.0.
2. A student may request Academic Renewal for no more than four semesters of work accomplished at Xavier.
3. Students may receive Academic Renewal only one time during their Xavier career.
4. Academic Renewal is irreversible.
5. To qualify for Renewal, a minimum of six consecutive semesters must occur between the end of the semester in which the student was last registered at Xavier and being readmitted to the university. For example, if a student were to leave the university during the Spring 2016 semester, they would need to remain un-enrolled at Xavier until at least the summer of 2018 and would be eligible to apply for Academic Renewal as early as Fall 2018. For these purposes there are three semesters per academic year: Fall, Spring, and Summer. A student who does not have at least six consecutive semesters in which they are not enrolled at Xavier does NOT qualify for Academic Renewal.
NOTE: A student may be enrolled at another institution during their hiatus from Xavier. Rules regarding transfer credit will apply to any credits earned at other institutions.
6. Prior to applying for Academic Renewal, the student must have earned no grade lower than a C in a minimum of 12 hours of regularly graded course work. Academic Renewal must be applied for prior to earning 24 hours of credit post reenrollment. (Generally, this will mean a student applies for Academic Renewal during the second semester of re-enrollment.)
7. With approval of the college dean, courses with a grade of C or better may be carried forward as earned credits and may be applied toward the degree though they will not affect the student’s post-Renewal GPA. Courses with a grade of F taken prior to Academic Renewal are notated on the transcript and do not count as earned credits, as satisfying any graduation requirements, or toward the student’s post-Renewal GPA. All courses with a grade of D can also be notated on the transcript and do not count as earned credits, do not count as satisfying any graduation requirements, and do not count toward the GPA. Courses with a grade of D may be moved forward as earned credits applied toward the degree if the courses can meet core requirements.
8. Once Academic Renewal is approved, the cumulative grade point average is calculated utilizing only classes taken post readmission.
NOTE: If the department or college has placed the student on probationary status, it is not automatically changed by Academic Renewal.
9. The student will be subject to the current Xavier catalog at the time of readmission regarding all policies, required course work, etc.
10. The number of course retakes, repeat/deletes, and pass/fails available to the student will be reset to the number provided by current Xavier policy upon renewal.
11. Academic Renewal applies only to degree-seeking, undergraduate students.
12. All courses prior to Academic Renewal remain unaltered on the record to ensure a true and complete academic history.
13. Academic Renewal by Xavier University of Louisiana does not guarantee that other institutions will accept the standards of said Renewal. Many graduate and professional degree programs disregard undergraduate institution policies, and compute the undergraduate GPA utilizing all hours attempted when determining admission.
14. Academic Renewal does not affect financial aid history. Accumulated hours and award limits include all semesters of enrollment. Students who did not meet satisfactory academic progress in their last semester should contact the Office of Financial Aid to see if an appeal to regain federal aid is necessary and to check their overall financial aid requirements and status.
15. To apply for Academic Renewal students must fill out the Academic Renewal application and meet with the college dean to discuss the positive and negative effects of this decision. There are many benefits to Academic Renewal, however there are also drawbacks. Before a student applies, it is important to understand all the ramifications of this policy, including that it may delay graduation, because once approved this policy is irreversible.


Xavier University of Louisiana Academic Reprieve Policy
The purpose of Academic Reprieve is to disregard one semester of a student’s recorded poor academic performance when such work is deemed the result of a severe, traumatic, unforeseeable, and unavoidable life event outside of the student’s control. As a consequence, Academic Reprieve allows students to benefit from their current level of ability without being permanently penalized by a semester in which their academic
performance was affected by outside events such as severe illness or traumatic family issues. Academic Reprieve is meant to encourage students to continue their educational efforts at Xavier despite a one-semester setback due to extreme circumstances outside of their control.


A student may request Academic Reprieve at Xavier consistent with these guidelines:


1. Academic Reprieve is intended to facilitate timely graduation from Xavier University, which requires a GPA of 2.0. Therefore, it is available for students with a GPA below 2.0 in the semester for which reprieve is requested. It is not a vehicle for students who want to raise a grade point average already above 2.0.
2. A student may request Academic Reprieve for no more than one semester of work accomplished at Xavier.
NOTE: Whether a semester’s events meet the standard required to justify Academic Reprieve will be determined at the college dean’s discretion based on documented evidence. It is the student’s responsibility to provide adequate documentation of the event(s) that warrant reprieve, regardless of the timing of application.
3. Students may receive Academic Reprieve only one time during their Xavier career.
4. Academic Reprieve is irreversible.
5. With approval of the college dean, courses with a grade of C or better will be carried forward as earned credits, will be applied toward the degree, and will count toward the GPA. Courses with a grade of F taken during the Academic Reprieve semester are notated on the transcript and do not count as earned credits, do not count as satisfying any graduation requirements, and do not count toward the GPA. All courses with a grade of D can also be notated on the transcript and do not count as earned credits, do not count as satisfying any graduation requirements, and do not count toward the GPA. D or F courses dropped in this manner from the Academic Reprieve semester may be repeated under the Reprieve policy without counting towards limits outlined in the course retake or repeat-delete policies in the current catalog. Courses with a grade of D may be kept as earned credits, and, if so, will remain in the GPA, if the courses can meet core degree requirements.
NOTE: If the department or college has placed the student on probationary status, it is not automatically changed by Academic Reprieve.
6. Prior to applying for Academic Reprieve, the student must have earned no grade lower than a C in a minimum of 12 hours of regularly graded course work. Academic Reprieve must be applied for prior to earning 24 hours of credit post Reprieve semester. (Generally, this will mean a student applies for Academic Reprieve during the second semester of re-enrollment.)
7. Any retakes, repeat/deletes, and/or pass/fail classes in progress during the Reprieve semester and dropped under the Reprieve policy will NOT count toward the limits under the applicable retake, repeat/delete, or pass/fail policies. Any retakes, repeat/deletes, and/or pass/fails which were in progress during the Reprieve semester and were kept for the GPA and earned credits will continue to count toward the limits under the applicable retake, repeat/delete, or pass/fail policies.
8. Academic Reprieve applies only to degree-seeking, undergraduate students.
9. All courses taken in the semester for which Academic Reprieve is granted remain unaltered on the record to ensure a true and complete academic history.
10. Academic Reprieve by Xavier University of Louisiana does not guarantee that other institutions will accept the standards of said Reprieve. Many graduate and professional degree programs disregard undergraduate institution policies, and compute the undergraduate GPA utilizing all hours attempted when determining admission.
11. Academic Reprieve does not affect financial aid history. Accumulated hours and award limits include all semesters of enrollment. Students who did not meet satisfactory academic progress in their last semester should contact the Office of Financial Aid to see if an appeal to regain federal aid is necessary and to check their overall financial aid requirements and status.
12. To apply for Academic Reprieve students must fill out the Academic Reprieve application and meet with the college dean to discuss the positive and negative effects of this decision. There are many benefits to Academic Reprieve, however there are also drawbacks. Before a student applies, it is important to understand all the ramifications of this policy, including that it may delay graduation, because once approved this policy is irreversible.


Xavier University of Louisiana Curriculum Change Clemency Policy
The purpose of Curriculum Change Clemency is to facilitate student progression toward graduation when a student chooses a new degree program in a different department that has differing requirements from a previous major in which the student was unsuccessful. Curriculum Change Clemency disregards previously recorded poor academic performance in courses not required for the new degree program when such work does not reflect the student’s current abilities, academic and career interests, or work ethic. As a consequence, Curriculum Change Clemency allows students to benefit from their current level of ability without being permanently penalized by time in a major for which the student was ill-suited. Curriculum Change Clemency is meant to encourage students to continue their educational efforts at Xavier when the weight of low grades earned in a previously selected major would otherwise make success unlikely.


A student may request Curriculum Change Clemency at Xavier consistent with these guidelines:


1. Students may receive Curriculum Change Clemency only one time during their Xavier career.
2. Curriculum Change Clemency is irreversible.
NOTE: Once granted Clemency, students are prohibited from majoring in their former department at any point while at Xavier University.
3. A student may request Curriculum Change Clemency for no more than two semesters of work accomplished at Xavier.
4. Prior to applying for Curriculum Change Clemency, the student must have earned no grade lower than a C in a minimum of 12 hours of regularly graded course work post change of major. Curriculum Change Clemency must be applied for prior to earning 24 hours of credit post change of major. (Generally, this will mean a student applies for Curriculum Change Clemency during the second semester in their new major).
NOTE: It is the student’s responsibility to officially change their major a semester (or 12 hours of credit) prior to requesting Curriculum Change Clemency.
5. To apply for Curriculum Change Clemency, a student must have written permission from their new Department Head and Division Chair.
NOTE: It is the purview of the Department Head and Division Chair to determine whether or not to support a student’s application for Curriculum Change Clemency. Once supported by the Department Head and Division Chair, it is the purview of the college dean to decide whether or not to approve a student’s application for Curriculum Change Clemency.
6. With approval of the college dean, courses in the Clemency semester(s) with a grade of C or better will be carried forward as earned credits, will be applied toward the degree, and will count toward the GPA. Courses with a grade of F taken during the Clemency semester(s) are notated on the transcript and do not count as earned credits, do not count as satisfying any graduation requirements, and do not count toward the GPA. All courses with a grade of D can also be notated on the transcript and do not count as earned credits, do not count as satisfying any graduation requirements, and do not count toward the GPA. Courses with a grade of D may be kept as earned credits if the courses can meet core requirements, and, if so, will remain in the GPA.
NOTE: If the college has placed the student on probationary status, it is not automatically changed by Curriculum Change Clemency.
7. The number of course retakes, repeat/deletes, and pass/fails utilized during the Clemency semester(s) will NOT reset and will count toward the total allowable credits for the student’s academic career as outlined in Xavier policy in the applicable academic catalog.
8. Curriculum Change Clemency applies only to degree-seeking, undergraduate students.
9. All courses taken in the semester(s) for which Curriculum Change Clemency is granted remain unaltered on the record to ensure a true and complete academic history.
10. Curriculum Change Clemency by Xavier University of Louisiana does not guarantee that other institutions will accept the standards of said Clemency. Many graduate and professional degree programs disregard undergraduate institution policies, and compute the undergraduate GPA utilizing all hours attempted when determining admission.
11. Curriculum Change Clemency does not affect financial aid history. Accumulated hours and award limits include all semesters of enrollment. Students who did not meet satisfactory academic progress in their last semester should contact the Office of Financial Aid to see if an appeal to regain federal aid is necessary and to check their overall financial aid requirements and status.
12. To apply for Curriculum Change Clemency students must fill out the Curriculum Change Clemency application and meet with the appropriate Department Head, Division Chair, and college dean to discuss the positive and negative effects of this decision. There are many benefits to Curriculum Change Clemency, however there are also drawbacks. Before a student applies, it is important to understand all the ramifications of this policy, including that it may delay graduation, because once approved this policy is irreversible.


Xavier University of Louisiana Course Repeat/Delete Policy
The purpose of repeating and deleting a course is to facilitate student progression toward graduation. This policy allows a student to repeat a course and remove the lower grade from the GPA.


A student may repeat and delete a course at Xavier consistent with these guidelines:


1. Students will be allowed to repeat/delete only three courses during their careers at Xavier.
2. A student may repeat/delete a given course only one time.
3. Utilizing the course repeat/delete policy is irreversible. A course will be marked as repeat/delete at the beginning of the semester. No changes may be made after the initial add period.
NOTE: Withdrawing from a course will NOT reset the repeat/delete status of the course. Thus, one of the three allowable repeat/delete courses will have been used and the course will not be applicable for repeat/delete a second time.
4. Utilizing the course repeat/delete policy, the student’s GPA will be calculated using the highest grade earned.
5. To repeat/delete a course, students must meet with their advisor to get written permission and discuss the positive and negative effects of this decision.
6. The repeat/delete policy applies only to degree-seeking, undergraduate students.
7. All courses taken remain unaltered on the record to ensure a true and complete academic history.
8. The acceptance of a repeat/delete course by Xavier University of Louisiana does not guarantee that other institutions will accept the standards of this repeat/delete policy. Many graduate and professional degree programs disregard undergraduate institution policies and compute the undergraduate GPA utilizing all hours attempted when determining admission.
9. Repeating courses does not affect financial aid history. Accumulated hours and award limits include all semesters of enrollment. Students who did not meet satisfactory academic progress in their last semester should contact the Office of Financial Aid to see if an appeal to regain federal aid is necessary and to check their overall financial aid requirements and status.
10. To utilize the repeat/delete policy students must meet with their advisor to discuss the positive and negative effects of this decision. There are many benefits to repeat/delete, however there are also drawbacks. Before a student signs up for a course as repeat/delete, it is important to understand all the ramifications of this decision, including that it may delay graduation, because once the initial drop deadline passes, it is irreversible.


Xavier University of Louisiana Course Retake Policy
The purpose of retaking a course is to facilitate student progression toward graduation. This policy allows a student to retake a course even if the repeat/delete policy is no longer available either because the student has already repeat/deleted three different courses or because the student is retaking a class for the third time.


A student may retake a course at Xavier consistent with these guidelines:


1. Students will be allowed to retake only three courses during their careers at Xavier.
2. A student may retake a given course only one time.
3. Utilizing the course retake policy is irreversible. A course will be marked as retake at the beginning of the semester. No changes may be made after the initial add period.
NOTE: Withdrawing from a course will NOT reset the retake status of the course. Thus, one of the three allowable retake courses will have been used and the course will not be applicable for retake a second time. (For exceptions see below.)
4. Utilizing the course retake policy, the student’s GPA will be calculated using both grades.
5. To retake a course, students must meet with their advisor to get written permission and discuss the positive and negative effects of this decision.
6. Exceptions to this policy may be granted by department heads for majors or minors with junior or senior standing where a C or better is required for the major or minor or if the student is ineligible to progress in their program without a passing grade.
7. The retake policy applies only to degree-seeking, undergraduate students.
8. All courses taken remain unaltered on the record to ensure a true and complete academic history.
9. The acceptance of retake courses by Xavier University of Louisiana does not guarantee that other institutions will accept the standards of this policy. Many graduate and professional degree programs disregard undergraduate institution policies and compute the undergraduate GPA utilizing all hours attempted when determining admission.
10. Retaking courses does not affect financial aid history. Accumulated hours and award limits include all semesters of enrollment. Students who did not meet satisfactory academic progress in their last semester should contact the Office of Financial Aid to see if an appeal to regain federal aid is necessary and to check their overall financial aid requirements and status.
11. To utilize the retake policy students must meet with their advisor to discuss the positive and negative effects of this decision. There are many benefits to retake, however there are also drawbacks. Before a student signs up for a course as retake, it is important to understand all the ramifications of this decision, including that it may delay graduation, because once the initial drop deadline passes, it is irreversible.


Xavier University of Louisiana Pass/Fail Policy
The purpose of designating a course pass/fail is to encourage students to challenge themselves and broaden their knowledge while at Xavier when the fear of a low grade in an elective course negatively impacting the GPA might otherwise discourage academic curiosity.


A student may utilize the P/F policy for a course at Xavier consistent with these guidelines:


1. Students with sophomore status (more than 29 hours) or above will be allowed to designate only three courses as P/F during their careers at Xavier. Freshman may NOT utilize the P/F policy.
2. A student may designate only elective courses as P/F.
3. Designating a class as pass/fail is irreversible. A course will be designated as a pass/fail course at the beginning of the semester. No changes may be made after the initial add period.
NOTE: Withdrawing from a course will NOT reset the P/F status of the course. Thus, one of the three allowable P/F courses will have been used even if the student withdraws.
4. The P/F policy denotes grades of A-C as passing and grades of D and F as failing. Failing counts as an F on the GPA and does not count as earned hours, while courses passed do not impact the GPA but do count as earned hours.
NOTE 1: By ensuring that all pass (P) grades are of a C or better courses may count in a major or minor should a student change major or minor after the semester in which they designated the course as P/F. Courses must be considered an elective according to the student’s plan of study at the time they begin the course.
NOTE 2: Should a major or minor change occur after taking a course P/F, it is up to departments to set their own policies regarding accepting a P/F toward major or minor requirements. Students must consult individual department policies.
5. To take a course as P/F, students must meet with their advisor and the course instructor to get written permission from both after discussing the positive and negative effects of this decision.
NOTE: It is up to the discretion of the course instructor whether or not they will allow a designated course to be taken as P/F. It is recommended that students contact the instructor directly the semester before the course begins to find out if they will allow the course to be taken as P/F.
6. The P/F policy applies only to degree-seeking, undergraduate students.
7. All courses taken remain unaltered on the record to ensure a true and complete academic history.
8. The acceptance of a P/F course by Xavier University of Louisiana does not guarantee that other institutions will accept the standards of this policy. Many graduate and professional degree programs disregard undergraduate institution policies and compute the undergraduate GPA utilizing all hours attempted when determining admission.
9. Taking courses as P/F does not affect financial aid history. Accumulated hours and award limits include all semesters of enrollment. Students who did not meet satisfactory academic progress in their last semester should contact the Office of Financial Aid to see if an appeal to regain federal aid is necessary and to check their overall financial aid requirements and status.


To utilize the P/F policy students must be of sophomore status and meet with their advisor to discuss the positive and negative effects of this decision. There are many benefits to P/F, however there are also drawbacks. Before a student signs up for a course as P/F, it is important to understand all the ramifications of this decision, because once the drop deadline passes, it is irreversible.

Approved by Academic Council on 10/25/16

Requirements for Two Degrees

Current Policy

A Xavier student may earn two degrees by successfully completing all requirements of two department/division programs that result in two different degrees, i.e. a B.A. and a B.S.  A student has five years to complete the second degree and all requirements must follow the same catalog.  At most, one second degree may be earned.  The second degree must include at least 30 hours of credit more than the single degree (typically 158 hours).”

Revised Policy

A Xavier student may earn two degrees by successfully completing all requirements of two department/division programs that result in two different degrees, i.e. a B.A. and a B.S.  A student has five years to complete the second degree and all requirements must follow the same catalog.  At most, one second degree may be earned.  The second degree must include at least 30 hours of credit more than the single degree (typically 150 hours).”

Core Curriculum Requirements for Transfer Students

Current Policy

There is no current policy.

New Policy

Transfer students with an associate degree from a community college or who have achieved junior standing at a four-year institution will generally be required to take six hours of coursework (one three-hour course in African American and Diaspora Studies and one three-hour course in Theology) to complete core curriculum requirements towards a Xavier degree. However, the requirement for one or both courses will be waived if the transcripts show that a student has taken at least three hours of coursework in that area.

Approved by Academic Council on 2/23/17

Online/Hybrid Courses:  Freshmen and Students on Strict Probation

Current Policy

There is no current policy.

New Policy

Freshmen with 29 or fewer credit hours are not allowed to take online and hybrid courses. The students may request an exception with their advisors if they can demonstrate previous successful experiences with online and/or hybrid courses.

Students on strict probation should obtain the permission of their advisor in consultation with SASO in order to take an online or a hybrid course.

 

Biology

Change of course title(s)

BIOL 4320  Organic Evolution has changed to BIOL 4320  Evolutionary Biology

Approved by Academic Council on 10/25/16

BIOL 3162 Introduction to Embryology has changed to BIOL 3162 Developmental Biology
BIOL 3162L Introduction to Embryology Lab has changed to BIOL 3162L Developmental Biology Lab

Informational Item mentioned at Academic Council Meeting on 2/23/17

Policy Update(s)

Current Policy #1
Students in other majors who wish to minor in Biology must take BIOL 1230/BIOL 1230L, BIOL 1240/BIOL 1240L, and at least ten additional hours of Biology numbered 1210 and above.

New Policy #1
Students in other majors who wish to minor in Biology must take BIOL 1230/BIOL 1230L, BIOL 1240/BIOL 1240L, and at least ten additional hours of Biology, excluding courses designated in the catalog as not applicable to a minor in Biology.

Current Policy #2
BIOL 1240 is a prerequisite for all higher-numbered courses in Biology.

New Policy #2
Unless otherwise noted in the course description, BIOL 1240 is a prerequisite for all higher-numbered courses in Biology.

New Course(s)

BIOL 3801, 3802, 3803.  Studies in Biology.  Specific topics are announced when the course is offered, and may include biological and interdisciplinary studies in relation to local communities, global issues, or other aspects of the university mission.  BIOL 1240 is not a default prerequisite, but the instructor may announce a prerequisite for the particular course of study.  Not applicable as a Biology Elective for students majoring or minoring in Biology.  (1, 2, or 3)

Approved by Academic Council on 5/1/17

BIOL 4521, 4522.  Undergraduate Research.  Research in biology with a mentor approved by the Biology Department head.  Students whose research is mandated by a scholarship program, or who receive a stipend for research are not permitted to register for this course.  A written report of research is required to be submitted to the mentor at the end of the course.  The course may be repeated for credit, but a maximum of 4 credit hours may be earned in BIOL 4521 and 4522 combined.  Prerequisites:  Permission of the research mentor and the Biology Department head.  (1 or 2)

Approved by Academic Council on 4/18/17

Course deletion(s)

BIOL 4520.  Undergraduate Research

Informational item at the Academic Council meeting held on 4/18/17

Deletion of Degree Program(s)

The deletion of the Accelerated (3+1) Biology Premedical program was introduced at an Academic Council meeting on 5/1/17 and a subsequent vote by Council members agreed to remove the program from the program offerings.

Chemistry

Curriculum Change(s)

Program in Chemistry (Preprofessional)

Current Program (Senior Year only)

1st Semester

CHEM 3130 Introduction to Biochemistry  

CHEM 3130L Introduction to Biochemistry Laboratory  

CHEM 4999 Senior Comprehensives  

BIOL Electives 2 (3 hours)

Expansive Core (3 hours)

Fine Arts Essential Core (3 hours)

Philosophy Essential Core 4 (3 hours)

BIOL Electives 2 (4 hours)

 

2nd Semester

CHEM 4999 Senior Comprehensives  

Capstone Course 1 (2-3 hours)

BIOL Electives 2 (3 hours)

Expansive Core (3 hours)

Fine Arts Essential Core (3 hours)

Advanced CHEM elective (3 hours)

 

New Program (Senior Year only)

1st Semester

CHEM 4999 Senior Comprehensives  

BIOL Electives 2 (3 hours)

BIOL Electives 2 (4 hours)

Expansive Core (3 hours)

Philosophy 4 (3 hours)

 

2nd Semester

Advanced CHEM Elective (3 hours)

Capstone Course 1 (2-3 hours)

CHEM 4999 Senior Comprehensives  

BIOL Electives 2 (3 hours)

Expansive Core (3 hours)

Fine Arts (3 hours)

 

1 Capstone course can be selected from the following: CHEM 4320L Molecular Structure and Organic Synthesis Laboratory , CHEM 4310L Synthesis Laboratory CHEM 4080 Introduction to Research CHEM 4083 Undergraduate Research ,
and CHEM 4150L Genomics and Proteomics Lab .

2 The choice of biology electives must conform to the following two guidelines:

1. Total biology hours must be at least 22, including General Biology I-II.
2. All four advanced biology electives must come from groups A and B below. At least one course must be taken from each of the two groups.

Group A: BIOL 3350 Anatomy and Physiology /BIOL 3350L Anatomy and Physiology Lab ; BIOL 3162 Introduction to Embryology /BIOL 3162L Introduction to Embryology Lab BIOL 4111 Histology /BIOL 4111L Histology Lab ;
BIOL 4091 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy /BIOL 4091L Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy Lab .

Group B: BIOL 2010 General Microbiology /BIOL 2010L General Microbiology Lab BIOL 3070 Immunology /BIOL 3070L Immunology Lab BIOL 3091 Cell Biology /BIOL 3091L Cell Biology Lab ,
BIOL 3110 Genetics /BIOL 3110L Genetics Lab , BIOL 4240 Microbial Physiology BIOL 4250 Molecular Genetics /BIOL 4250L Molecular Genetics Lab   .

4 PHIL 2400 Health Ethics  is recommended for students planning a career in the health professions.

Change was submitted prior to the creation of the 2016-2017 catalog and was later added on 3/17/17

Program in Chemistry (Prepharmacy), B.S.

Deleted BIOL 2010L General Microbiology Lab  from the second semester of the sophomore year and replaced it with BIOL 2010 General Microbiology . Performed the same operation to the list of minors in the summary.

Updated on 4/20/17

Deletion of Degree Program(s)

The deletion of the Chemistry (Pre-professional) Accelerated 3+1 program was introduced at an Academic Council meeting on 5/1/17 and a subsequent vote by Council members agreed to remove the program from the program offerings.

Education

Updated Curriculum for Elementary Education Grades 1 - 5 Certification

FRSM (2 ch/2 ch)
FRSM 1                      1 Essential Core
FRSM 2                      1 Essential Core

English (12 ch/12 ch)                                                             Hours
1000/1010       Composition & Rhetoric                                 3 Fundamental Core
1020                Composition & Literature                               3 Fundamental Core
2010                World Literature 1                                          3 Essential Core
2200                Modern English Grammar                              3 Expansive Core

Science (16 ch/12 ch)
BIOL 1030/1030L or 1040 1040L                                        3 Fundamental Core
PHYS 1530    How Things Work                                           3 Expansive Core
IPSC 2020      Earth Science                                                3 Other Required Course
IPSC 4010      Adv. Earth Science                                        3 Other Required Course


African American Diaspora Studies (3 ch/3 ch)
AADS any course                                                                   3 Essential Core

History (9 ch/6 ch)
HIST 1030/1040 World Civilization                                      3 Essential Core
HIST 3040      Louisiana History or GEOG 3020 Louisiana and Its Resources        3 Other Required Course

Mathematics (12 ch/12 ch)
MATH 1010   Principles of Modern Math                              3 Fundamental Core
MATH 1015   College Algebra                                              3 Essential Core
MATH 2015   Geometry for Teachers                                   3 Other Required Course
MATH 2025   Finite Math for Teachers                                 3 Other Required Course

Fine Arts (3 ch/3 ch)
ART 1090 Art Appreciation or ART 1210 Engaging Digital Media or MUSH 2000 Music Appreciation Essential Core

Philosophy (6 ch/6 ch)
PHIL any 1000                                                                       6 Essential Core


Theology (6 ch/6 ch)
THEO 1                                                                                  3 Essential Core
THEO 2                                                                                  3 Essential Core

Communication Studies (3 ch/3 ch)
CMST 1010  Public Speaking                                              3 Essential Core

Social Science (3 ch/3 ch)
PSCI 1020      American Government                                    3 Essential Core

World Languanges (6 ch/6 ch)
Foreign Language 1                                                                3 Fundamental Core
Foreign Language 2                                                                3 Fundamental Core

Physical Education (4 ch/1 ch)
PHED Activity Course                                                           1 Essential Core


Teaching Reading (12 ch/9 ch)
EDUC 3050A Methods of Teaching Reading                    3
     (Will frame the course using children’s literature)
EDUC 3050B Methods of Teaching Reading                    3
     (Proposed to change the focus of this course from general reading skills to phonics and required for grades 1 - 8)
EDUC 4113r   Clinical Reading Methods                              3
     (Proposed to be required for grades K - 12 and not just 1 - 5)

Teaching Mathematics (9 ch/6 ch)
EDUC 3060A Strategies and Methods for Elementary Math
EDUC 3060B Strategies and Methods for Elementary Math

Teacher Prep (0 ch/0 ch)
EDUC 1000     Prerequisite for all Education majors

The Learner (15 ch/15 ch)
EDUC 2???   Child & Adolescent Psychology                   3
       (Proposed to combine EDUC 2015 Child Psychology for grades 1 - 8 majors & EDUC 4090 Adolescence Psychology, for secondary 6 - 12 majors)
EDUC 2040    Intro to the Exceptional Child                      3
EDUC 2044    Classroom Management                             3
EDUC 2200    Multicultural Education                                3
EDUC 3040    Educational Psychology                              3   Expansive Core

Methodology (6 ch/9 ch)
EDEL 3071     Curriculum Applications                              3
EDUC 2100   Methods of Teaching grades K - 12             3
       (This course is a combination of EDEL 2100, EDUC 2100 and EDSC 2100.  It will include the course objective of EDEL 3071 - effective strategies for teaching language arts and social studies and EDEL 3081 - effective strategies for teaching mathematics and science)
EDUC 4030    Evaluation & Measurement

Student Teaching (9 ch/12 ch)
EDUC 4060A            Student Teaching                                         12 (6 each semester [2])
       (Required Teacher Residency per Bulletin 996)
EDUC 4060S  Student Teaching Seminar                             0

PRAXIS EXAMS = EDUC 4999 Senior Comprehensive Exam - all 0 ch
EDUC 2005M Praxis PPST Math
EDUC 2005R Praxis PPST Reading
EDUC 2005W Praxis PPST Writing
EDUC 3005L Praxis Principles of Learning & Teaching (PLT)
EDUC 4005S Praxis Content

Approved by Academic Council on 3/28/17

Updated Curriculum for Middle School Grades 4-8

FRSM (2 ch/2ch)
FRSM 1                      1 Essential Core
FRSM 2                      1 Essential Core

English (12 ch/12 ch)
1000/1010 Composition & Rhetoric                           3 Fundamental Core  
1020    Composition & Literature                               3 Fundamental Core  
2010    World Literature                                            3 Essential Core  
2200    Modern English Grammar (new course for 4 - 8 majors) 3 Expansive Core

Science (16 ch/12 ch)                                                             Hours
BIOL 1030/1030 or 1040/1040L                                            3 Fundamental Core
IPSC 2020      Earth Science                                                 3 Other Required Course
IPSC 4010      Adv. Earth Science                                         3 Other Required Course
PHYS 1530     How Things Work                                           3 Essential Core

African American Diaspora Studies (3 ch/3 ch)
AADS any course                                                                  3 Essential Core

History (9 ch/6 ch)
HIST 1030/1040 World Civilization                                      3 Essential Core
HIST 3040 Louisiana History or GEOG 3020 Louisiana and Its Resources           3 Other Required Course

Mathematics (12 ch/12 ch)
MATH 1030/1030i  Pre Calculus                                           3 Essential Core
MATH 2015   Geometry for Teachers                                   3 Other Required Course
MATH 2025   Finite Math for Teachers                                 3 Other Required Course
STAT 1020/MATH 1020        Basic Statistics                        3 Essential Core

Content (7 ch/4 ch)
MATH 1070 Introductory Calculus or CHEM 1010/1010D/1011L Gen Chemistry 1/drill         4 Other Required Course

Fine Arts (3 ch)
ART 1090 Art Appreciation or ART 1210 Engaging Digital Media or MUSH 2000 Music Appreciation or CMST 2010 Performance of Literature or CRWT 1050 Introduction to Creative Writing              

Philosophy (6 ch/6 ch)
PHIL any 1000                                                                       3 Essential Core
PHIL any non 1000                                                                3 Essential Core

Theology (6 ch/6 ch)
THEO 1                                                                                  3 Essential Core
THEO 2                                                                                  3 Essential Core

Communication Studies (3 ch/3 ch)
CMST 1010  Public Speaking or                                            3 Essential Core
CMST 2010 Performance Literature

Social Science (3 ch/3 ch)
PSCI 1020      American Government                                    3 Essential Core

World Languanges (6 ch/6 ch)
Foreign Language 1                                                              3 Fundamental Core
Foreign Language 2                                                              3 Fundamental Core

Physical Education (1 ch/1 ch)
PHED Activity Course                                                             1 Essential Core

The Learner (15 ch/15 ch)
EDUC 2???     Child & Adolescent Psychology                    3
    (Proposed to combine EDUC 2015 Child Psychology for grades 1 - 8 majors & EDUC 4090
EDUC 2040    Intro to the Exceptional Child                        3
EDUC 2044    Classroom Management                               3
EDUC 2200    Multicultural Education                                  3
EDUC 3040    Educational Psychology                                3

Teacher Prep (0 ch/0 ch)
EDUC 1000                                                                          0

Methodology (9 ch/12 ch)
EDUC 2???     Methods of Teaching grades K - 12             3
     (This course will be a combination of EDEL 2100, EDUC 2100 and EDSC 2100.  It will absorb the course objective of EDEL 3081 - effective strategies for teaching mathematics and science and EDEL 3071 effective strategies for teaching language arts and social studies).
EDUC 3060B Math Strategies/Methods grades 4 - 8          3
EDUC 4030 Evaluation and Measurement                          3
EDEL 3071 Curriculum Application                                     3

Teaching Reading (6 ch/6 ch)
EDEL 3050B Methods of Teaching Reading                       3
    (Proposed to no longer be required for grades 4 - 8)
EDUC 4113r   Clinical Reading Methods or
EDUC 4150 Reading in the Content AreaK - 123
    (New for grades 4 - 8)

Student Teaching (9 ch/12 ch)
EDUC ????     Teacher Residency                           12 (6 ch per semester [2 semesters])
   (Required Teacher Residency per Bulletin 996)
EDUC 4060S  Student Teaching Seminar                  0

PRAXIS EXAMS = EDUC 4999 Senior Comprehensive Exam
EDUC 2005M Praxis PPST Math
EDUC 2005R Praxis PPST Reading
EDUC 2005W Praxis PPST Writing
EDUC 3005L Praxis Principles of Learning & Teaching (PLT)
EDUC 4005S Praxis Content

Approved by Academic Council on 4/18/17

Updated Curriculum for Secondary Education Grades 6-12

FRSM (2 ch/2ch)
FRSM 1                      1 Essential Core
FRSM 2                      1 Essential Core

English (9 ch/9 ch)
1000/1010       Composition & Rhetoric                                 3 Fundamental Core  
1020                Composition & Literature                               3 Fundamental Core  
2010                World Literature                                            3 Essential Core   

Science (6 ch/3 ch)
BIO 1030/1040 and 1030L/1040L General Biology and Lab           3 Fundamental Core   

African American Diaspora Studies (3 ch/3 ch)
AADS  Any course                                         3 Essential Core

History (3 ch/3 ch)
GEOG 3020  Louisiana and Its Resources    3 Essential Core

Mathematics (6 ch/6 ch)
MATH 1020 Basic Statistics I            3 Essential Core
Any Math or CPSC                           3 Expansive Core

Fine Arts (3 ch/3 ch)
ART 1090 Art Appreciation or ART 1215 Engaging in Digital Media or MUSH 2000 Music Appreciation or CMST 2010 Performance of Literature or CRWT 1050 Introduction to Creative Writing
Philosophy (6 ch/6 ch)
PHIL any 1000               3 Essential Core
PHIL any non1000         3 Essential Core

Theology (6 ch/6 ch)
THEO any Theology     3 Essential Core
THEO any Theology     3 Essential Core

Communication Studies (3 ch/3 ch)
CMST 1010 Communication Studies      3 Essential Core

Social Sciences (3 ch/3 ch)
PSCI 1020 American Government  3 Essential Core

World Languages (6 ch/6 ch)
Foreign Language                  6 Fundamental Core

Physical Education (1 ch/1 ch)
PHED any activity course      Essential Core

The Content (31 - 33 ch/24 ch)
English, Mathematics, History, Spanish, French, Art, Biology, Chemistry

Expansive Core (6 ch/6 ch)
BIO, IPSC, CHEM, PHYS

Teacher Prep (0 ch/0ch)
EDUC 1000                            0 ch

The Learner (15 ch/15 ch)
EDUC 2???     Child & Adolescent Psychology
EDUC 2040  Intro to Exceptional Child
EDUC 2044  Classroom Management
EDUC 2200  Multicultural Education
EDUC 3040  Educational Psychology 

Methodology (3 ch/9 ch)
EDUC 2???  Methods of Teaching K - 12
     (This course will be a combination of EDEL 2100, EDUC 2100 and EDSC 2100.)
EDUC 4030 Evaluation and Measurements

Reading (3 ch/6 ch).
EDUC 4113R Clinical Procedure in Remedial Reading (new for 6 - 12)
EDSC  4150 Reading in the Content Area K -12

Student Teaching (9 ch/12 ch)
EDUC ????     Teacher Residency                             12 (6 ch per semester [2 semesters])
     (Required Teacher Residency per Bulletin 996)
EDUC 4060S  Student Teaching Seminar                             0

PRAXIS EXAMS = EDUC 4999 Senior Comprehensive Exam
EDUC 2005M Praxis PPST Math
EDUC 2005R Praxis PPST Reading
EDUC 2005W Praxis PPST Writing
EDUC 3005L Praxis Principles of Learning & Teaching (PLT)
EDUC 4005S Praxis Content

Approved by Academic Counsil on 4/18/17

Languages

Change of course title(s)

MDRN 1010 - Elementary Mandarin has changed to CHIN - Elementary Mandarin

MDRN 1020 - Elementary Mandarin has changed to CHIN - Elementary Mandarin

MDRN 2010 - Intermediate Mandarin has changed to CHIN - Intermediate Mandarin

MDRN 3010 - Special Topics in Chinese has changed to CHIN - Special Topics in Chinese

Approved by Academic Council on 1/26/17

New Course(s)

SPAN 4035:  Representations of Black Africans in Hispanic Literature. This course explores the representation of Black Africans in Spanish and Spanish American literary works starting in the Middle Ages and ending in the present.  The class studies the historic roles of Black Africans in Spain, Spanish America and the Caribbean, and analyzes their presence in poetry, prose, and drama. Students learn about the development of racism and the intersection of race, class, and gender in Hispanic culture and literature.  Prerequisites: placement test score of 400 or higher or completion of Spanish 3001 or higher. Recommended to be cross-referenced as AADS 4035. (3)

Approved by Academic Council on 4/18/17

SPAN 3021.  Spanish Civilization.  This course gives an overview of the geography, history, and cultural production of Spain and serves as an introduction to the socio-historic context of Spanish literature taught in more advanced classes required for majors and minors.  Pre-requisites: Spanish 2020 or the equivalent; or placement test score of 3000.

Approved by Academic Council on 4/18/17

SPAN 4071, 4072, 4073.  Independent Study.  Students conduct an independent study or research project with the approval, guidance and supervision of an instructor from the Department of Languages. The project must be an area of study or activity that is not covered by another course and may be conducted on or off campus. Prerequisites: Approval of instructor and department head  (1, 2, 3)

Approved by Academic Council on 4/18/17

FREN 4071, 4072, 4073.  Independent Study.  Students conduct an independent study or research project with the approval, guidance and supervision of an instructor from the Department of Languages. The project must be an area of study or activity that is not covered by another course and may be conducted on or off campus. Prerequisites: Approval of instructor and department head  (1, 2, 3)

Approved by Academic Council on 4/18/17

FREN 3020.  Introduction to Afro Francophone Cultural Readings.  A survey of selected international Francophone oral and written literature and the social, cultural and historic factors that have given rise to their development throughout the Francophone societies of Africa and the New World Diaspora, particularly in the Antilles.  Class participants will develop an ability to read critically in a literature that is the product of cultures that may be unfamiliar to them. No prerequisites. Taught in English. (3)

Approved by Academic Council on 5/1/17

Proposal to reduce the degree credit-hour requirement in French B.A. and Spanish B.A. from 128 to 120 credit hours

Current policy:
The current policy is that students must complete 128 hours for graduation with a degree in Languages.  This current policy includes 3 extra hours in math beyond the Core (total = 6 hours); and 3 extra hours in English Literature (beyond 2010) (total = 12 hours);

Revised policy:
The new policy is that students must complete 120 hours for graduation with a degree in Languages.   This new policy would include the elimination of 3 extra hours in math and the elimination of 3 extra hours in English Lit. It would also include the elimination of 2 hours of free electives The total number of 8 hours would be eliminated from our current language curriculum in order for students to graduate with a new total of 120 hours.

Approved by Academic Council on 5/1/17

Mass Communication

Reduction in program hours

The number of credit hours necessary to complete a B.A. degree in Mass Communication was reduced from a total of 129 hours to 120 hours. The following curriculum table provides a summary of the new curriculum:

Fundamental
Core

Essential
Core
Expansive
Core
MSCM
Core
MSCM
Concentration
Minor
18 36 6 33 9 18
Total Credits 120

Approved by Academic Council on 1/31/17

Change in concentrations

Currently the Mass Communication department has 3 concentrations: print, broadcast and strategic communication/public relations. The change is to combine the print and broadcast concentration to become one new concentration titled Multimedia Concentration.

There is only one required course in the concentration: MSCM 2950 Radio and TV Announcing. All other courses in the concentration students can elect from the list of MSCM courses offered from the catalogue. All required courses for the major are included in the Mass Comm Core. Therefore for the concentration, students can select Mass Comm courses outside of the Mass Comm core to develop skills and expertise in the areas of the industry they wish to have careers in.

Approved by Academic Council on 1/31/17

Changes to the Mass Communication minor

Current version:

MSCM 1100 Introduction to Mass Communication  

MSCM 1200 Principles of Visual Media  

MSCM 2222 Introduction to Converged Media Writing.  OR

MSCM 2500 Intermediate Converged Media Writing  and

Nine hours of electives that can be chosen among the MSCM courses

Proposed changes to the Minor:

MSCM 1100 Introduction to Mass Communication  

MSCM 2030 Principles of Strategic Communication  

MSCM 2222 Introduction to Converged Media Writing.  

Nine hours of electives that can be chosen among the MSCM courses

Approved by Academic Council on 1/31/17

Course Title Change(s)

MSCM 2007 PR Practicum, MSCM 2008 Newspaper Practicum, and MSCM 2009 Broadcast Practicum changed to MSCM 2009 Practicum

MSCM 3007 PR Practicum, MSCM 3008 Newspaper Practicum, and MSCM 3009 Broadcast Practicum changed to MSCM 3009 Practicum

MSCM 4007 PR Practicum, MSCM 4008 Newspaper Practicum, and MSCM 4009 Broadcast Practicum changed to MSCM 4009 Practicum

MSCM 2580 Appreciation and History of Film changed to MSCM 2580 Film Appreciation

MSCM 3150 News Editing changed to MSCM 3150 Copy Editing

MSCM 3190 Fundamentals of Television Production changed to MSCM 2190 Fundamentals of Broadcasting

MSCM 3400 Design for Digital Media changed to MSCM 3400 Social Media

MSCM 4000 Feature Writing for Newspapers and Magazines changed to MSCM 4000 Feature Writing

MSCM 4020 TV Program Production changed to MSCM 4020 Broadcast Programming and Production

MSCM 2222 Introduction to Converged Media Writing changed to MSCM 2400 Introduction to Converged Media Writing

MSCM 3650 Advanced Topics in Production changed to MSCM 3650 Advanced Topics in the Media

Approved by Academic Council on 1/31/17

New Course(s)

MSCM 3400. Social Media. The Social Media course teaches students about the evolution of social networks, its popularity among consumers and audiences, and its relevance to not only media industries but all organizations as they communicate to the public in a digital age. Students will also learn the effective use of social media and will consider the future of social media in today’s society. Prerequisite: none (3)

MSCM 3650. Advanced Topics in the Media. The course examines a specific niche subject or expertise in the field of Mass Communication. Specific subject matter would be chosen by the course instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor (3)

Approved by Academic Council on 1/31/17

Pharmacy

The total number of semester hours to complete the Degree of Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm. D.) was erroneously listed as 188(189). The correct number of semester hours is 138(139).

Changed on 1/5/17

The total number of Clinical Pharmacy hours changed from 78 to 87. The total number of semester hours to complete the Degree of Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm. D.) was changed from 138(139) to 147(148).

Changed on 3/9/17

Philosophy

New Course(s)

PHIL 1040. Meaning of Life. This course asks the most important question of all: What is the meaning of life? Philosophers from diverse traditions will be our guides. Their reflections on how to live and how to think about life and death encourage us to examine our own beliefs and values; we explore different paths to meaning, learn about crises of meaning and their causes, and clarify our own perspective on what it means to live a meaningful, fulfilling life. Prerequisite: Completion of any required developmental reading course. (3)

Approved by Academic Council on 3/28/17

PHIL 1050.  Quest for Knowledge.  This course asks the all-important question: What, if anything, can be known with certainty? Philosophers from diverse traditions, past and present, will be our guides.  Their investigations into the acquisition and limits of knowledge will encourage us to examine our own views, and will prepare us to successfully navigate the complex, ever-changing world in which we live.  Prerequisite: Completion of any required developmental reading course. (3)

Approved by Academic Council on 3/28/17

PHIL 2070.  Introduction to Bioethics.  Introduces and provides a foundation for the interdisciplinary study of Bioethics, engaging in particular the disciplines of Philosophy, Biology, Theology, Public Health Sciences, Psychology, and Sociology. This course is designed to give students a broad overview of the methods, core content areas, and central ethical questions in this field. Note:  This course is not eligible as one that fulfills the Essential Core in the Current Core Curriculum requirements for Philosophy or Theology, nor toward the Essential Core Natural Science requirement.  Similarly, for the Core Curriculum Proposal in process, this course is not eligible as one that fulfills the requirements for the Explorations in the Liberal Arts regarding Faith and Society, The Examined Life, and Scientific Reasoning, which must include a lab component.) Pre-Requisites: None (3)

Approved by Academic Council on 4/18/17

PHIL 4900.  Senior Thesis.  This course is required of all philosophy majors.  The student will pursue a research topic under the guidance of a philosophy instructor.  The research will culminate in a scholarly paper.  Students should make plans to enroll in this course at least one semester prior to enrollment, including arranging supervision by an instructor with expertise and interest in the student’s area of interest.  Prerequisite: senior standing. (3)

Minor in Bioethics

Bioethics is the study of the ethical dimensions inherent in medical and scientific research, the delivery and practice of health care, and the creation of national and global health policy. In addition to normative analysis, the study of these important topics requires critical examination of the philosophical and theological underpinnings, social and political context, and cultural variables that shape and transform medicine and the life sciences. For this reason, Bioethics is an interdisciplinary field that brings different methodological and conceptual analyses to a core set of concerns that includes: the doctor-patient relationship, the allocation of scarce medical resources, the relationship between human beings and the natural environment, scientific and medical experimentation, access to healthcare, assisted dying and end-of-life care, genetic engineering and enhancement, and advances in biotechnology, genetics, and neuroscience.

 Required Courses

The minor consists of 1) the interdisciplinary “Introduction to Bioethics” course, 2) one eligible course in Biology or Public Health, 3) one eligible course addressing social and cultural issues, 4) two eligible courses in philosophical and theological ethics, and 5) Advanced Bioethics (three credit hours). The Minor requires 18 total credit hours, and students may not count the same course toward their major and their minor. Students must earn at least a C in the class in order for it to count toward the minor.

 “Introduction to Bioethics” PHIL 2060/THEO 2060 (required):

 This team-taught course will be offered every year and will be cross-listed in Philosophy and Theology. Biology professors will present guest lectures. It is designed to give students a broad overview of the methods, core content areas, and central ethical questions in the field of Bioethics.

Category 1 (select one course):
BIOL 1050 – Environmental Biology
BIOL 2000 – Biodiversity
BIOL 3210 - Ecology
PHLT 1001 – Introduction to Public Health

Category 2 (select one course):
PSYC 2050 – Health Psychology
SOCI 1011 – Global Social Change
SOCI 3070 – Medical Sociology
CMST 1080 – Health Communication
PHIL 3250 – Philosophy of Science

Category 3 (select two courses):
THEO 2500 – Theological Ethics
THEO 2550 – Environmental Issues in Christian Perspective
PHIL 2045 – Ethics: General Principles
PHIL 2400 – Health Ethics
PHIL 3400 – Ethical Conduct in Scientific Research

Category 4: Advanced Bioethics (select one course):
The Advanced Bioethics course gives students the opportunity to focus on a specific set of issues in Bioethics. Students will be asked to use the conceptual tools that they acquired as they progressed through the Minor.

Approved by Academic Council on 4/18/17

Psychology

Change of course title(s)

PSYC 4050 Psychopharmacology changed to PSYC 4050 Drugs and Behavior

PSYC 4085 Clinical Neuropsychology changed to PSYC 4085 Disorders of the Brain

Approved by Academic Council on 10/25/16

New course(s)

PSYC/NSCI 4020. Cognitive Neuroscience. Cognitive neuroscience is the study of mental functions and the neural mechanisms that support them. The aim of this class is to introduce students to the basic theories, methods, and key findings of cognitive neuroscience across the domains of motor control, perception, language, memory, attention, emotion, plasticity, and neurodegenerative disorders. The course materials and related assignments will present an overview of the basic topics that have been in the forefront of cognitive neuroscience over the past few years. After completion of the course, students are expected to demonstrate knowledge of the key findings, theories, and methods employed in research on cognitive neuroscience. Prerequisite:  PSYC 1010. Recommended:  PSYC 3050 (3)

Approved by Academic Council on 2/23/17

Minor in Cognitive Neuroscience

Neuroscience non-majors will also have the option to minor in Cognitive Neuroscience. A minor in Cognitive Neuroscience requires 18 hours of course work. Cognitive Neuroscience minors must complete 9 hours of required courses and 9 hours of qualifying elective courses in Cognitive Neuroscience.

Required courses include:

Introduction to Psychology (PSYC 1010)
Physiological Psychology (NSCI/PSYC 3050)
Drugs & Behavior (NSCI/PSYC 4050)

Students must select 9 hours of course work from the following course list:

Comparative Psychology (PSYC 2070)
Cognitive Neuroscience (currently NSCI/PSYC 4000S)
Disorders of the Brain (NSCI/PSYC 4085)
Computer Science I (CPSC 1710)
Introduction to Scientific Computing* (CPSC 2230, recommended to co-register w/ CPSC 1230)
Introduction to Computational Data Analysis* (CPSC 1230, recommended to co-register w/ CPSC 2230)
Discrete Structures for Computer Science and Mathematics I (MATH 2550)
Biostatistics (MATH 3010)

Note: Psychology majors are eligible to minor in Cognitive Neuroscience with the following stipulations:
Since all PSYC majors must take PSYC 1010, PSYC 1010 cannot count for the Cognitive Neuroscience minor. Instead, PSYC majors must take an additional NSCI Elective course from the list above (raising the elective requirement from 9 hours to 12 hours).
PSYC majors cannot have any course that counts for the major to simultaneously count for the minor. This means that all Neuroscience courses taken for the minor cannot be counted toward the PSYC major.

Approved by Academic Council on 1/31/17

Cross-listed Course(s)

PSYC 3050 Physiological Psychology is cross-listed with NSCI 3050 Physiological Psychology
PSYC 4050 Drugs & Behavior is cross-listed with NSCI 4050 Drugs & Behavior
PSYC 4000S Cognitive Neuroscience is cross-listed with NSCI 4000S Cognitive Neuroscience
PSYC 4085 Disorders of the Brain is cross-listed with NSCI 4085 Disorders of the Brain

Approved by Academic Council on 1/31/17 as part of the approval of the Minor in Neuroscience

Major in Neuroscience

The Bachelor of Science in Neuroscience is a 27-hour major that will be housed in the Department of Psychology of the Division of Social and Behavioral Sciences in the College of Arts and Sciences. The Neuroscience major will offer coursework in Psychology, Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics and Computer Science.  The Neuroscience program mission statement reads as follows:

“The mission of the neuroscience program is for Xavier students to gain understanding and skills relevant to the broad field of neuroscience, including current issues, trends, and questions in the field. Drawing most heavily on the offerings of its home department of psychology, but with additional courses in biology, chemistry, mathematics, and computer science; the program’s interdisciplinary curriculum provides students with content knowledge across the field, training students to become future leaders in the field. Graduates of the program are qualified to work as scientists, to pursue further graduate training in neuroscience or other scientific fields, or to enter training programs for health professionals.”

The undergraduate program in Neuroscience objectives are:

  • Develop an appreciation for and breadth of knowledge that spans the full range of neuroscience sub disciplines, including developmental, molecular, cellular, systems, behavioral, cognitive, and computational neuroscience.
  • Be able to place neuroscience into an ethical context, especially how studying the brain and behavior can contribute to the resolution of ethical, social, and environmental issues.
  • Provide students with a sufficient depth of knowledge and abilities to prepare them for entry-level employment in a wide variety of fields, or for graduate study in neuroscience or health-related professions.

Graduation Requirements:

  • 120 total semester hours of coursework with a 2.0 cumulative GPA
  • 27 total semester hours of major courses (see “Required Courses” below)
  • No grade lower than a “C” in major courses
  • Completion of Double concentration in Biology and Chemistry (24 hours)
  • Completion of the College of Arts and Sciences core curriculum (52 hours)
  • Completion of enough University electives to reach 120 hours (~17 hours)
  • Completion of a neuroscience research project

Program in Neuroscience:

Note:  Credit hours are in parenthesis

Freshman year - fall semester

  • PSYC 1010 (essential core) (3)
  • BIOL 1230 (3)
  • BIOL 1230L (1)
  • ENGL 1010 (Fund. Core) (3)
  • Phys Ed (essential core) (1)
  • FRSM 1000 (1)
  • CMST (essential core) (3)

Total hours:  15

Freshman year - spring semester

  • PSYC 2020 (3)
  • BIOL 1240 (3)
  • BIOL 1240L (1)
  • ENGL 1020 (3)
  • MATH 1030/1070 (fund. Core) (4)
  • FRSM 1100 (1)

Total hours:  15

Sophomore year - fall semester

  • PSYC 3050 (3)
  • CHEM 1010/1010D (3)
  • CHEM 1011L (Fundamental core) (1)
  • History (essential core) (3)
  • World Language (fund. core) (3)
  • ENGL 2010 (essential core) (3)

Total hours:  16

Sophomore year - spring semester

  • BIOL 3300 (3)
  • CHEM 1020/1020D (3)
  • CHEM 1021L (1)
  • Theology (essential core) (3)
  • World Language (fund. core) (3)
  • PHIL (essential core) (3)

Total hours:  16

Junior year - fall semester

  • BIOL 3110 (3)
  • BIOL 3110L (1)
  • CHEM 2210/2210D (3)
  • CHEM 2230L (1)
  • University Elective (3)
  • NSCI Quantitative Elective (3)

Total hours:  14

Junior year - spring semster

  • PSYC 4000S/NSCI Elective (3)
  • PHIL 2040/2400 (3)
  • University Elective (3)
  • Theology (essential core) (3)
  • AADS (3)

Total hours:  15

Senior year - fall semester

  • NSCI Quantitative Elective (3)
  • Fine Arts (essential core) (3)
  • PSYC/NSCI Elective (3)
  • University Elective (3)
  • NSCI 4999
  • University Elective (3)

Total hours:  15

Senior year - spring semester

  • Expansive core (MATH 1020 if Pre-Med) (3)
  • BIOL/CHEM Elective (3)
  • University Elective (3)
  • Expansive Core (3)
  • University Elective (2)

Total hours:  14

SUMMARY: PROGRAM IN NEUROSCIENCE

Fundamental Core                                                              16
English Composition (6, ENGL 1000/1010 and ENGL 1020), Language (6 of same language), Mathematics (4, MATH 1030 or MATH 1070).

Essential Core                                                                     30
African American Studies (3), Communications Studies (3), Fine Arts (3), First Year Experience (2, FRSM 1000 and FRSM 1100), History (3), Philosophy (6, including PHIL 2040/2400), Physical Education (1, Activity-Based), Social Science (0, PSYC 1010), Theology (6), World Literature (3, ENGL 2010)

Expansive Core                                                                     6

Required Neuroscience Courses                                         12 
PSYC 1010 (3, covers Social Science of Essential Core), PSYC 2020 (3), NSCI/PSYC 3050 (3), NSCI/BIOL 3300 (3)

Neuroscience/Psychology Electives Courses (2 required)    6
PSYC 2070 (3), PSYC 3080 (3), PSYC 3100 (3), NSCI/PSYC 4000S (3), NSCI/PSYC 4050 (3), NSCI/PSYC 4085 (3)

Biology/Chemistry Elective Courses (1 required)                  3
BIOL 3091/3091L (4), BIOL 3150 (3), BIOL 3162/3162L (4), BIOL 3350/3350L (4)*, BIOL 4111 (3), BIOL 4250 (3), CHEM 2220/2240L (4)*+, CHEM 3130 (3)*

Quantitative Courses (2 required)                                          6
PSYC 2020 (3), PSYC 2511 (3), CPSC 1710 (3), CPSC 2230 (2, recommend co-register w/ CPSC 1230), CPSC 1230 (1, recommend co-register w/ CPSC 2230), MATH 2550 (3)#, MATH 3010)#

Double Concentration                                                          24
CHEM 1010/1011L (4, covers Natural Science w/ lab of Fundamental Core), CHEM 1020/1021L (4), CHEM 2210/2230L (4), BIOL 1230/1230L (4), BIOL 1240/1240L (4), BIOL 3110/3110L)                                                                                                                                  

Electives                                                                               17

Total Hours                                                                          120  

* Course recommended for students to fulfill pre-medical admission requirements.
+ Organic Chemistry II w/ lab (CHEM 2220/2240L) is a pre-requisite for Biochemistry (CHEM 3130)
# Pre-requisite for both MATH 2550 and MATH 3010 is MATH 1070

Approved by Academic Council on 3/21/17

Public Health Sciences

Course deletion(s)

PHLT 3003: Fundamentals of Program Evaluation

Approved by Academic Council on 10/25/16

New course(s)

PHLT 3004 Research Methods. This course will expose students with an introduction to skill related to the research process, including research design, data collection methods and procedures, scientific writing, and oral presentation of research findings. (3)

Approved by Academic Council on 10/25/16

Change of course title(s)

PHLT 2002 Health Promotion Program Planning changed to PHLT 2002 Health Promotion Program Planning & Evaluation

Approved by Academic Council on 10/25/16

Sociology

New Concentration(s)

B.A. in Sociology - Crime and Social Justice

39 hours (15 common Sociology core, 9 hours CSJ required courses, 15 CSJ elective hours including up to 9 hours from outside Sociology)

CSJ Required Courses include:

SOCI 2020 Introduction to Criminology  
SOCI 2042 Deviance  
Seminar in Crime and Social Justice

CSJ Electives include:

SOCI 2010 Social Problems  or SOCI 2040 Sociology of Gender  or SOCI 2050 Sociology of the Family  or SOCI 2060 Race and Ethnic Relations  or PSCI 2100 Law, Politics, and Society  and 3 of the 5 courses listed in Group A

OR

4 of the 5 courses listed in Group A

Group A
SOCI 3025 African American Urban Life  
SOCI 3035 Sociology of Mental Health  
SOCI 3100 Social Policy  
PSCI 3110 Civil Rights and Civil Liberties  
CMST 3030 Race, Culture and Communication  

AND one of the following in Group B

Group B
SOCI 4020 Urban Sociology  
SOCI 4080 Race, Class and Gender Inequality  
SOCI 4810 Special Topics in Sociology  

The concentration has three defining features that distinguish it from similar programs:
A. an interdisciplinary component;
B. a required internship, and;
C. a required capstone seminar in CSJ.

Approved by Academic Council on 1/26/17

New Course(s)

SOCI 4800.  Crime and Social Justice Seminar.  This course is a summary, or capstone course, for those students pursuing a B.A. in Sociology who are in the Crime and Social Justice Concentration.  Through seminar discussions and projects students in the course will integrate knowledge regarding criminology, deviance, structural forces impacting crime and responses to crime, and critical analysis of social institutions and public policy affecting crime, control and society.  Instructors adopt a specific focus each semester that synthesizes material and skills encompassed in the Crime and Social Justice Concentration.  Prerequisites:  SOCI 1010, SOCI 2042 or SOCI 2020, SOCI 2530 (or related Research Methods course from another discipline).

Approved by Academic Council on 5/1/17

Theology

Course title change(s)
THEO 2500 Moral Theology has changed to THEO 2500 Theological Ethics

Informational Item mentioned at Academic Council Meeting on 3/21/17

Course number change(s)
THEO 3800 Environmental Issues in Christian Perspectives has changed to THEO 2550 Environmental Issues in Christian Perspectives

Informational Item mentioned at Academic Council Meeting on 3/21/17

New Course(s)

THEO 4000. Capstone Seminar. The Capstone Seminar is designed to demonstrate your accumulated training in Theology in a single original project of your choice, subject to the instructor’s approval and under the additional supervision of a faculty mentor. The completed thesis or project should bring together the project thesis and each of the three concentrations in the Theology Program. The Capstone necessitates multiple drafts of your research that are subjected to heightened peer review and regular feedback from your instructor, your peers, and your mentor.  Prerequisites: THEO 1100, THEO 1120, THEO 1170 (3)

Approved by Academic Council on 3/28/17

THEO 2070.  Introduction to Bioethics.  Introduces and provides a foundation for the interdisciplinary study of Bioethics, engaging in particular the disciplines of Philosophy, Biology, Theology, Public Health Sciences, Psychology, and Sociology. This course is designed to give students a broad overview of the methods, core content areas, and central ethical questions in this field. Note:  This course is not eligible as one that fulfills the Essential Core in the Current Core Curriculum requirements for Philosophy or Theology, nor toward the Essential Core Natural Science requirement.  Similarly, for the Core Curriculum Proposal in process, this course is not eligible as one that fulfills the requirements for the Explorations in the Liberal Arts regarding Faith and Society, The Examined Life, and Scientific Reasoning, which must include a lab component.) Pre-Requisites: None (3)

Approved by Academic Council on 4/18/17

Changes to the requirements for a B.A. in Theology

The total number of credit hours to earn a B.A. in Theology is reduced from 128 hours to 120 hours. It will be implemented as follows:

Change #1:  The number of required THEO credit hours is reduced from 39 hours to 36 hours. Seminars, THEO 3010S, THEO 3012S, and THEO 3020S, are no longer required. THEO 4000 is required for the 4000 level THEO requirement.
Change #2:  ENGL 2020 is no longer a requirement.
Change #3:  The number of free electives is reduced from 11 hours to 9 hours.

 

Approved by Academic Council on 3/28/17