University Catalog 2017-2018 
    
    Jun 23, 2018  
University Catalog 2017-2018

Department of Physics and Computer Science


Division of Mathematical and Physical Sciences

NCF Science Annex 233 - (504) 520-7643 - http://www.xula.edu/physics-engineering/index.html 

Programs in Physics

Students electing physics as a major have the option of pursuing a program leading to either a bachelor of science (B.S.) or a bachelor of arts (B.A.) degree. The B.S. program is designed for the student who plans a career as a physicist or as an engineer. The B.A. program is pursued by students as preparation for further study and work in such fields as medicine, law, physical chemistry, biophysics, business administration, psychology, education, and many others.

The objective of the B.S. curriculum in physics is to equip the student with those skills (logical reasoning, problem analysis and solution, techniques in experimentation) and knowledge (fundamental concepts) necessary for entry into either graduate study in physics or the work force. The B.S. curriculum requires the student to take a total of 138 semester hours, with at least 51 in physics and 22 in mathematics.

The objective of the B.A. curriculum in physics is to enable the student to develop patterns of analytical reasoning and problem-solving which would be useful in the student’s chosen area outside of physics - medicine, law, etc. It is also intended that this curriculum will enable the student to acquire experiences that will serve as a foundation for later study in the chosen area of specialization. The student in the B.A. curriculum takes a total of 132 semester hours, with at least 24 in physics, 19 in mathematics and 24 in the area of specialization.

All majors must take a written comprehensive examination during the senior year dealing with the fundamentals of the various fields of physics and attend all departmental meetings. All dual degree engineering majors need to take a written examination in their junior year to receive a physics degree after completing the engineering degree requirements. In order for a physics or mathematics course to be counted for degree credit, a student must have a “C” or better in it.

All programs require taking the CHEM 1110 -CHEM 1120  sequence, however the CHEM 1010 -CHEM 1020  sequence may be substituted if a scheduling conflict does not permit taking the recommended 1110-1120 sequence. Note that a student’s chemistry courses must all be in one of the sequences.

Programs in Computer Science

The computer science program prepares students to advance computing as a science and a profession. Computing is important to virtually every other discipline so computing students learn to analyze complex interdisciplinary problems and develop good solutions using creative problem-solving skills. Students have opportunities to study mobile application development, business, data mining, graphics, robotics, networking, security, and many other computing areas. At graduation, computer science majors are leaders prepared for graduate school or for stable careers that have excellent salaries.

The Physics & Computer Science Department offers the Bachelor of Science degree in Computer Science, the Bachelor of Science degree in Computer Information Systems, the Minor in Computer Science, and a Bachelor of Science degree in Computer Science with a Dual Degree in Computer Engineering. All majors require the same introductory programming sequence then diverge and the computer science majors take more mathematics courses, the computer information systems majors take more business courses, and the dual degree computer engineering majors take more mathematics and physics courses.

At the completion of the undergraduate degree requirements, our graduates are able to apply design techniques and programming practices to solve challenging problems; they have a breadth of knowledge in the theory and practice of computing; they understand the joys and challenges of teamwork; they are able to effectively communicate their knowledge; they have had research opportunities that enhance their knowledge; and they are prepared to be life-long learners in the computing sciences and beyond.

The computer science curricula are based on the recommendations of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), the Association of Information Technology Professionals (AITP), and the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET). The University requires a minimum of 120 hours earned overall which includes the courses required to complete the core curriculum, a minor, and a major.

In addition to all University policies, computer science majors can earn no more than 25% of their computer science (CPSC) courses from another institution. No more than 10% of their earned 3000-level or above CPSC courses can be transferred from another institution.

To earn a Bachelor of Science Degree in Computer Science, a student must earn a total of 120 semester hours; earn a “C” or better in all Computer Science Department courses accepted for credit; earn a “C” or better in all Mathematics Department courses accepted for credit; and earn a  “C” or better in Philosophy Logic (PHIL 2040 ).

To earn a Bachelor of Science Degree in Computer Information Systems, a student must earn a total of 120 semester hours; earn a “C” or better in all Computer Science Department courses accepted for credit; earn a “C” or better in all Business Division courses accepted for credit; and earn a “C” or better in Philosophy Logic (PHIL 2040 ).

Xavier also has a Dual Degree Engineering Program. This 3+2 program requires students to complete core courses and then transfer to an engineering school to complete their engineering degree requirements. Upon completion of the degree requirements, students will earn a Bachelor of Science Degree in Computer Science from Xavier and a Bachelor’s Degree in Computer Engineering from their engineering school.

Students choosing a double concentration in Computer Science and another discipline, must earn a total of 12 hours with a grade of “C” or better in CPSC 1710 , CPSC 1720 , CPSC 2120 , and CPSC 2730 . An additional 12 hours is required in the other selected discipline of which specific courses might be required. Students are advised to check with the selected department that houses the discipline for the most up-to-date requirements.

Computer Science majors with (1) a 3.5 grade point average in all computer science and mathematics courses accepted for credit, and (2) a cumulative 3.3 grade point average overall have earned the graduation distinction of “Honors in Computer Science”. Students must meet the academic requirements throughout their tenure in the Physics & Computer Science Department.

Computer Information Systems majors with (1) a 3.5 grade point average in all computer science and business courses accepted for credit, and (2) a cumulative 3.3 grade point average overall have earned the graduation distinction of “Honors in Computer Information Systems”. Students must meet the academic requirements throughout their tenure in the Physics & Computer Science Department.

Programs

    Bachelor of ArtsBachelor of ScienceNon-degree