University Catalog 2017-2018 
    
    Jul 23, 2018  
University Catalog 2017-2018

Addendum



African American and Diaspora Studies

AADS 2030 (ALCS 2030). Introduction to the Afro-Francophone World (taught in English). A survey of selected international Francophone oral and written literature and the social, cultural and historic factors that have given rise to their development throughout the Francophone societies of Africa and the New World Diaspora, particularly in the Antilles. (3)

Approved by Academic Council on 4/4/18

AADS 2050 (ALCS 2050). Readings on Afro Latin America and the Caribbean. A survey of selected readings on the Black presence in Latin America and the Caribbean by Afro Latin American, Caribbean, and mainstream authors of literature through their transformation and development into a corpus of literary works throughout Latin America. This elective culture course is not a substitute for major, minor, literature or language-based requirements. Readings will be literary, cultural and historical. This course may be offered either in a target language or in English. (3)

Approved by Academic Council on 4/4/18

Art

Changes to Art Minor

Current Policy:

The minor in Art requires eighteen (18) hours, including Design Ia-b (6 hrs - ART 1010  and ART 1020 ) and Drawing I (3 hrs - ART 1030 ). The additional nine hours are chosen from:

ART 1050 Introduction to Ceramics  
ART 1060 Introduction to Painting 
ART 2020 Introduction to Graphic Design  
ART 2070 Introduction to Sculpture 
ART 2080 Introduction to Printmaking 
ART 2110 History of Art Ia  
ART 2120 History of Art Ib  
ART 2130 Special Topics in Art History    
ART 3011 Advanced Black and White Photography 
ART 3050 Painting 2, Intermediate Painting  
ART 3060 Painting 3, Advanced Painting    
ART 3070 Sculpture 2, Intermediate Sculpture  
ART 3090 Printmaking 2 Intermediate Printmaking  
ART 4010 Graphic Design 2, Intermediate Graphic Design 
ART 4020 Graphic Design 3, Advanced Graphic Design  
ART 4140 Art of the African Diaspora  

Updated Policy:

The minor in Art requires eighteen (18) hours, including Design (3 hrs - ART 1010  or ART 2020 ) and Art History (3 hrs - ART 1090  or ART 2110  or ART 2120 ). The additional twelve (12) hours are to be chosen, in consultation with an advisor in the Department of Art, from:

ART 1010 Design Ia  
ART 1030 Drawing 1 Beginning Drawing 
ART 1050 Introduction to Ceramics 
ART 1060 Introduction to Painting 
ART 2020 Introduction to Graphic Design 
ART 2070 Introduction to Sculpture 
ART 2080 Introduction to Printmaking 
ART 2110 History of Art Ia 
ART 2120 History of Art Ib 
ART 2130 Special Topics in Art History 
ART 3020 Web Design  
ART 3022 Digital Color Photography 
ART 3050 Painting 2, Intermediate Painting 
ART 3060 Painting 3, Advanced Painting 
ART 3070 Sculpture 2, Intermediate Sculpture 
ART 3090 Printmaking 2 Intermediate Printmaking 
ART 3011 Advanced Black and White Photography 
ART 4010 Graphic Design 2, Intermediate Graphic Design 
ART 4020 Graphic Design 3, Advanced Graphic Design 
ART 4140 Art of the African Diaspora  

Approved by Academic Council on 10/3/17

New Course(s)

ART 2510 (ENGL 2510). The Graphic Novel & Social Justice. This course is an interdisciplinary examination of comic art as a vehicle for social justice. This course will teach students to access comics, a genre generally dismissed as non-literary, at multiple levels: the textual, the visual, and the contextual. Students will develop and enhance skills at interpretation through these multiple literacies to value the political and cultural statements that can be made through the comic form. Students will also learn how to manipulate these various literacies to express their own commentaries upon issues of social justice important to them. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1000 /ENGL 1010 -ENGL 1020  ; or ENGL 1023H . (3, EXP)

Approved by Academic Council on 10/3/17

Biology

New Course(s)

BIOL 3250. Introduction to Bioinformatics. This interdisciplinary course will introduce concepts in the application of computational approaches to solving problems in biology. Topics include basic principles of molecular biology, DNA/RNA sequencing, global, local and multiple sequence alignment, use of web databases, sequence assembly, and phylogenetics. Other topics will include methods to computationally find genomic abnormalities. The course will also provide a basic introduction to algorithmic approaches to implementing bioinformatics solutions. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 1240 /BIOL 1240L  with a grade of C or better. (3)

Approved by Academic Council on 4/4/18

BIOL 4230. Biology Capstone. Students will synthesize, integrate, and apply the knowledge and skills gained from courses that are part of the Biology degree requirements as well as the core curriculum courses. There will be significant review of the primary literature and students will give both oral and written critiques. Prerequisite(s) Required of and limited to Biology majors with a minimum of 90 credit hours completed. (3)

Approved by Academic Council on 4/4/18

BIOL 4420. Applied Stem Cell Biology. This course takes students on a journey into the fast-moving field of stem cell biology.  Topics include: development and organogenesis, stem cell types and sources, therapeutic regeneration and repair of tissue, pluripotency and reprogramming, the relationship between stem cells, cancer and other potential undesirable effects, legality and ethics. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 3110  with a grade of “C” or better. (3)

Approved by Academic Council on 4/4/18

BIOL 4444. Human Genetics. In this course the principles and mechanisms of inheritance as they function in human will be discussed.  The topics covered include Inherited Diseases, Reproduction and Genetic Control of Development, Genetic Factors in Behavior, the Role of Genetics in Cancer, Genetic Testing, and Genetic Based Ancestry.  Required readings will be selected from journal articles and case studies. Prerequisite(s): A grade of “C” or better in BIOL 3110 . (3)

Approved by Academic Council on 4/4/18

Chemistry

New Course(s)

CHEM 4350. Drug Design Using Computational Chemistry. The course will introduce students to the basic computational molecular modeling tools used in drug design and development process.  The most commonly used techniques in the drug discovery such as building 3D-models of organic molecules, study their structural properties, Structure Activity Relationship studies (QSAR), molecular docking studies, pharmacophore development and database search will be taught in this course. The relationship between the structure of the drug and its bioactivity will be analyzed followed by identification of structural features that can be modified to improve the efficacy of the drug. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 2220 . (3)

CHEM 1004. Chemistry of Art. This course is designed for non-science majors who need a Fundamental Core natural science course with a lab component. This may be of special interest to art majors but artistic talent is not necessary to succeed. This course studies the fundamentals of chemistry and scientific principles as they relate to art, art media, and art history. Scientific fundamentals will be used to explain how art objects are observed, composed, manufactured, forged, and conserved. Regular lab sessions will be conducted during the semester. Prerequisite(s)Completion of all developmental Mathematics requirements or eligibility of MATH 1030 . (3)

Approved by Academic Council on 2/20/18

CHEM 1005. Food Chemistry. This course explores the chemistry of food and the cooking process from a scientific basis. The aim of this course is to explore the chemistry of food through lecture, discussion, hands-on-activities and laboratory experiments. Students will be introduced to the Scientific Method; basic chemical concepts involving matter and energy with a focus on solutions; and to the basic food categories (carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, minerals and water). Students will explore taste and flavor and the use of various cooking methods.  Each week students will create an edible experiment and explore the chemistry of each dish. (3)

Approved by Academic Council on 2/20/18

Course deletion(s)

CHEM 1003 Chemistry in Everyday Life  

Approved by Academic Council on 2/20/18

Communication Studies

Prerequisite Change(s)

Current description:

CMST 3030. Race, Culture and Communication. This course is an introduction to the study of rhetorical theories and practices across cultures. The primary purpose of this course is to study how the interconnections of race and culture shape communication as well as influence contemporary social issues. Prerequisite: CMST 1000, CMST 1010 or CMST 1011H, CMST 1400 or CMST 1500 or CMST 1080, CMST 2010, CMST 2180 OR instructor permission. (3)

Revised description:

CMST 3030. Race, Culture and Communication. This course is an introduction to the study of rhetorical theories and practices across cultures. The primary purpose of this course is to study how the interconnections of race and culture shape communication as well as influence contemporary social issues. Prerequisite: XCOR 1011 or XCOR 1012; completed at least 60 hours. (3)

Course level change

Current description:

CMST 4030. Performance of Everyday Life. This course focuses on the relationship between everyday life and aesthetic performance. We will explore how communication in everyday life may be understood using performance as a metaphor and method of study. We will discuss culture as a continuous performance, from the “ordinary” speech of an individual to the elaborate rituals and practices of groups and organizations. We will look at how these everyday performances construct and maintain culture. Prerequisite: None. (3)

Revised description:

CMST 2030. Performance of Everyday Life. This course focuses on the relationship between everyday life and aesthetic performance. We will explore how communication in everyday life may be understood using performance as a metaphor and method of study. We will discuss culture as a continuous performance, from the “ordinary” speech of an individual to the elaborate rituals and practices of groups and organizations. We will look at how these everyday performances construct and maintain culture. Prerequisite: None. (3)

English

New Course(s)

ENGL 2510 (ART 2510). The Graphic Novel & Social Justice. This course is an interdisciplinary examination of comic art as a vehicle for social justice. This course will teach students to access comics, a genre generally dismissed as non-literary, at multiple levels: the textual, the visual, and the contextual. Students will develop and enhance skills at interpretation through these multiple literacies to value the political and cultural statements that can be made through the comic form. Students will also learn how to manipulate these various literacies to express their own commentaries upon issues of social justice important to them. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1000 /ENGL 1010 -ENGL 1020  ; or ENGL 1023H . (3, EXP)

Approved by Academic Council on 10/3/17

ENGL 3025 (PHIL 3025, THEO 3025). The Ideal Society. This is an interdisciplinary course which employs humanistic methods to explore religious, philosophical and literary conceptions of an ideal society. Students will use literary works to inspire and imagine their own model of an ideal society, while learning to justify its values and structures rationally and with recourse to theological reflection.  Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1010 ; Three Semester Hours in Philosophy (No Theology prerequisites) (3, EXP)

Approved by Academic Council on10/3/17

ENGL 3666 (THEO 3666). The Devil in Sacred and Secular Literature. This course examines the theological and literary origins and evolution of the portrayal of the devil, from God’s prosecuting attorney in the Hebrew Bible to later portrayals as a monster of scientific creation. Students will explore how the character of the devil and the problem of evil impact a just and humane society by studying sacred texts from around the globe, including but not limited to the Hebrew Bible, the New Testament, and the Koran, as well as secular literature including but not limited to such texts as Dante’s Inferno, Marlowe’s Dr. Faustus, Milton’s Paradise Lost, and Defoe’s Political History of the Devil. (3, EXP)

Approved by Academic Council on10/3/17

ENGL 1025. Food in Literature. This course considers the subject of food as it appears in literature. In addition to reading literature, students will write essays (with an emphasis on argumentative), guided reflections, and a research project. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1000  or ENGL 1010 . (3, FaSpSu).

Approved by Academic Council on 4/6/18

ENGL 2085. Survey of African American Literature I. A survey of African American literature from its early origins to turn of the 20th century. Course provides a genealogy of the literature and includes study of different literary genres and rhetorical strategies while also addressing the historical, cultural, and social contexts in which they were created. Required of all English majors. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1010  -ENGL 1020  or ENGL 1023H  -
ENGL 2011H .
(3)

Approved by Academic Council on 4/6/18

ENGL 2095. Survey of African American Literature II. A survey of African American literature from the turn of the 20th century to the present. Course provides a chronological study of the various literary texts produced during the major art and culture movements of the 20th century including the Harlem Renaissance, Realism, Naturalism and Modernism, the Black Arts Movement, and the Contemporary Period. Required of all English majors. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1010  -ENGL 1020  or ENGL 1023H  - ENGL 2011H . For English Majors, this course should be taken following successful completion of ENGL 2040 and ENGL 2085. (3)

Approved by Academic Council on 4/6/18

ENGL 2040. Critical Approaches to Literature. Introduction to literary research including survey of theoretical approaches (examples:Historicism, Structuralism, Gender Studies, Reader-Response, Psychoanalytic, Race and Ethnic, Digital Humanities). Course serves as the foundation to all other advanced literature courses offered in the department. Required of all English majors. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1010  -ENGL 1020  or ENGL 1023H  -
ENGL 2011H .
(3)

Approved by Academic Council on 4/6/18

Update to Course Prerequisites

Prerequisites for courses ENGL 3040  & ENGL 3050  were formerly ENGL 1000  /ENGL 1010  and ENGL 1020  OR ENGL 1023H  and ENGL 2011H . The new prerequisites for both courses are:  ENGL 1020  or ENGL 1023H .

Approved by the English department head in October 2017.

Update to Course Descriptions

ENGL 2070. Survey of British Literature 1. A study of English literature and the history of the English language from the Middle Ages through the Restoration and the Eighteenth Century. (3)

Approved by Academic Council on 4/6/18

Update to earning Honors in English

Honors in English - Upon receiving a grade of “C” or better in ENGL 1023H  , the student will receive 3 semester hours of credit for ENGL 1010 .

Students may receive Honors in English in four different ways.

1. For initial placement in the Honors in English program, students must meet criteria that include ACT or SAT scores and high school transcript. The English Department determines final placement. To receive an honors distinction in English, students so chosen must take ENGL 1023H  and an additional 6 semester hours with any two English courses of their choice at the 2000, 3000, or 4000 levels, and receive a cumulative average of 3.0 or higher for all three courses (or their equivalent).

2. Students with Advanced Placement credit may take two more English courses at the 2000, 3000, or 4000 level. A cumulative average of 3.0 or higher in these two courses will earn them Honors in English.

3. A student who earns an “A” in ENGL 1010  may also qualify for the honors sequence. A student with credit in programs other than AP should consult the English department head for honors consideration.

4. Students need not be placed in the Freshman English Honors Sequence outlined above to qualify for Honors in English. Students majoring or minoring in English may also earn the honors distinction by completing their courses of study with a 3.5 cumulative average in English. At least eighteen semester hours of English must be earned at Xavier.

Students may use the AP or CLEP examinations as equivalencies for ENGL 1010  or ENGL 1020 . Students must have taken the essay portion of the exam as well as the objective portion and must meet with the department head for advising no later than the last day of registration to determine from which course(s) they may be exempt.

Approved by Academic Council on 4/19/18

History

New Course(s)

HIST 1400. Worlds of Trade: Consumers and Goods in World History Since 1400CE. Exploration of how the cultivation and exchange of certain goods transformed global societies, politics, and economies between 1400 CE and the present. This class will pay special attention to the connections between changing global markets and historical understandings of racial and ethnic identities, class structures, and discussions of government power. (3, EXP)

Approved by Academic Council on 10/3/17

Languages

New Course(s)

LANG 1050. Exploration of Afro Latin America and the Caribbean Studies. This course is an introduction to and exploration of the world of Afro Latin America and the Caribbean in terms of its historical development, its cultural context, and its diverse, extensive, and pervasive African influences throughout the region, and consequently, the world.  An examination of African contributions in this geographical region will result in an interdisciplinary perspective of knowledge across the spectrum of human behavior that has extended throughout the Americas and the Western world. Taught in English. (3, EXP)

Approved by Academic Council on 10/31/17

ALCS 2030 (AADS 2030). Introduction to the Afro-Francophone World (taught in English). A survey of selected international Francophone oral and written literature and the social, cultural and historic factors that have given rise to their development throughout the Francophone societies of Africa and the New World Diaspora, particularly in the Antilles. (3)

Approved by Academic Council on 4/4/18

ALCS 2050 (AADS 2050). Readings on Afro Latin America and the Caribbean. A survey of selected readings on the Black presence in Latin America and the Caribbean by Afro Latin American, Caribbean, and mainstream authors of literature through their transformation and development into a corpus of literary works throughout Latin America. This elective culture course is not a substitute for major, minor, literature or language-based requirements. Readings will be literary, cultural and historical. This course may be offered either in a target language or in English. (3)

Approved by Academic Council on 4/4/18

New Certificate Program

Spanish for Health Professionals Certificate Program

The curriculum consists of 15 credit hours. Students also have the option to do a clinical practicum during summer study along with courses. Those courses will also be offered at alternate times.

Required Courses:

SPAN 1090 Conversation and Culture  
SPAN 2051 Spanish for Medical Personnel 
SPAN 3001 Advanced Grammar and Composition  
SPAN 3011 Advanced Conversation  
SPAN 3012 Advanced Conversation  

Optional:

Clinical practicum in Costa Rica with homestay and full immersion in the target language

 

Admission to the program will be based upon the WEBCAPE proficiency test.

The program will be open to undergraduate students and professionals that meet the prerequisites and  can commit to the program.

Approved by Academic Council on 12/5/17

Minor in Afro Latin American and Caribbean Studies (ALCS)

To obtain a minor in Afro Latin American and Caribbean Studies, students must take 6 hours of required courses, 6 hours of Language courses, and 6 hours of interdisciplinary courses:

Required courses include: 

ALCS/AADS 1050: Exploration of Afro Latin America & Caribbean Studies (3) AND EITHER ALCS/AADS 2030 : Introduction to the Afro Francophone World (3) OR ALCS/AADS 2050: Readings on Afro Latin America and the Caribbean (3)

Language courses include: 

ALCS/AADS 3020/3015: Afro Latin American and Caribbean Culture and Readings (3) 

FREN/ALCS 3021: *Readings in Francophone Culture.     (3) 

FREN/ALCS/ AADS 3022 (WMST 3022): *Afro Francophone Women Writers.     (3)

FREN/ALCS/AADS 4010: *Littérature Africaine Francophone. (The Literature of French-Speaking Africa and the Caribbean).  (3)

ALCS/AADS 4025 (FREN4025 SPAN 4025, LANG 4025): Afro Latin American and Louisiana Oral Traditions: West African Tales and their Transmission to the New World.       (3, EXP) 

ALCS /AADS 4030 (FREN 4030, SPAN 4030, LANG 4030): Afro Latin American Culture and Civilization.      (3, EXP)

SPAN/ALCS/ AADS 4020:   *Afro Hispanic Studies.      (3, EXP)

SPAN/ALCS/ AADS 4035:  * Representations of Black Africans in Hispanic Literature.   (3)

Interdisciplinary courses include:

AADS 3020: Special Topics in African American and Diaspora Studies: “Ethnography of the African Diaspora”

AADS 3020: Special Topics in African American and Diaspora Studies:  “Latin America and the Caribbean” Parts I and II

AADS 3370: African Americans, Africa, and Pan Africanism.

ENGL 3185: Special Topics in African American Literature. [Afro Caribbean focus] Taught alternately as a special topics in Caribbean Literature, and including international novels by Afro Caribbean writers from St. Kitts, Haiti, Dominican Republic, Jamaica, Guyana, Martinique, etc.

ENGL 3275: The Post Colonial Novel. Typically includes novels from around the globe including Caribbean/Latin America (i.e., Garcia Marquez, Vargas Llosa, Allende, etc. and international films which have a diaspora focus.

ENGL 3400: Literary and Cultural Theory. Section of postcolonial theory and race theories which include authors from Caribbean/Latin America as well as throughout the African Diaspora (i.e. Stuart Hall, Franz Fanon, Barbara Christian etc.).

HIST 2700:  Introduction to Latin American History.

HIST 3675 (AADS 3675):   The Black Atlantic World.

HIST 3700 (AADS 3700):   Caribbean History and Roots.

HIST 3800 (AADS 3800):   Race in the Americas.

PSCI 4640: Politics of Developing Nations. Includes Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean.

SOCI 2060 (AADS 2060): Racial and Ethnic Relations

WMST 1030: Intro to Women’s Studies.   Introduction to Africana feminist theories and highlights feminism from Africa, Caribbean and The Diaspora.

Approved by Academic Council on 4/4/18

Mass Communication

Changes in Course Numbers

MSCM 2400 Introduction to Converged Media Writing has changed to MSCM 2222 Introduction to Converged Media Writing

Approved by the Head of the Mass Communication department in November 2017

MSCM 3400 Social Media has changed to MSCM 2400 Social Media

Approved by Academic Council on 1/31/17

Philosophy

New Course(s)

PHIL 3025 (ENGL 3025, THEO 3025). The Ideal Society. This is an interdisciplinary course which employs humanistic methods to explore religious, philosophical and literary conceptions of an ideal society. Students will use literary works to inspire and imagine their own model of an ideal society, while learning to justify its values and structures rationally and with recourse to theological reflection.  Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1010 ; Three Semester Hours in Philosophy (No Theology prerequisites) (3, EXP)

Approved by Academic Council on10/3/17

Course level change

Current:

PHIL 1040. The Meaning of Life. This course asks the most important question of all: What is the meaning of life? Philosophers from diverse traditions will be our guides. Their reflections on how to live and how to think about life and death encourage us to examine our own beliefs and values; we explore different paths to meaning, learn about crises of meaning and their causes, and clarify our own perspective on what it means to live a meaningful, fulfilling life. Prerequisite: Completion of any required developmental reading course.“  (3)

Revision:

PHIL 1040. Happiness and the Meaning of Life. This course asks the most important question of all: What is the meaning of life and what is the nature of happiness? Philosophers from diverse traditions will be our guides. Their reflections on how to live well and how to think about life and death encourage us to examine our own beliefs and values.  The course will explore different paths to meaning and happiness, learn about crises of meaning and their causes, and clarify our own perspective on what it means to live a meaningful, fulfilling, and good life. Prerequisite: Completion of any required developmental reading course. (3)

Approved by Academic Council on 3/20/18

PHIL 3015 (XCOR 3010). Aristotle in New Orleans. This course combines traditional classroom learning and service learning.  The course is designed around Aristotle’s insight that action and philosophical reflection must inform one another if we are to properly understand ourselves and live well.  In the classroom, students will study writings by Aristotle and others on the nature of rhetoric, argument, education, and virtue.  Students will also learn the fundamentals of formal debate.  Outside the classroom, students will participate in a seven week service learning project that involves coaching New Orleans middle school debate teams.  Prerequisite(s): XCOR 1011 or 1012; completion of at least 60 hrs. (3)

Approved by Academic Council on 4/4/18

Physics and Computer Science

New Course(s)

BINF 2500. Introduction to Bioinformatics. This interdisciplinary course will introduce concepts in the application of computational approaches to solving problems in biology. Topics include basic principles of molecular biology, DNA/RNA sequencing, global, local and multiple sequence alignment, use of web databases, sequence assembly, and phylogenetics. Other topics will include methods to computationally find genomic abnormalities. The course will also provide a basic introduction to algorithmic approaches to implementing bioinformatics solutions. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 1240 /BIOL 1240L  with a grade of C or better. (3)

Approved by Academic Council on 4/4/18

Public Health Sciences

Honors in Public Health Sciences

Requirements:

A 3.5 GPA in Public Health Sciences courses for majors and minors, and
A 3.3 Overall GPA, and
A minimum of 18 hours in Public Health Sciences must be taken at Xavier

Sociology

New Course(s)

SOCI 4820. Methods Seminar. This course is an in-depth, research-intensive exploration of a particular sociological research method.  Students will study the methodology in question, examine examples of research employing the method, and practice utilizing the method through a major research project.  Topics vary by semester according to faculty and student interest.  Prerequisite(s): 3 semester hours in sociology and completion of one of the following research methods courses: SOCI 2530 , PSCI 2010 , PSYC 2020 , PHLT 3004 , MSCM 3600  or CMST 3020 . (3)

Approved by Academic Council on 10/3/17

Change of credit hours and prerequisite(s)

SOCI 2500. Reading and Writing for Sociology. This course prepares students for upper level sociology courses by offering practice in active reading skills and instruction in the procedures and conventions for research and writing in the discipline of sociology. Topics include reading for deep learning, finding and evaluating secondary resources, and writing various types of sociological papers such as essays for tests, critical reviews, reaction papers, and literature reviews. Prerequisite(s): SOCI 1010; RDNG 0992, if required; a C or better in ENGL 1000 or 1010, or a D or better in ENGL 1020. (3)

Approved by Academic Council on 4/4/18

Speech Pathology

Course Title Change

Current title:  SPTH 3920. Articulation Disorders.

Revised title:  SPTH 3920. Articulation and Phonological Disorders.

Approved by Academic Council on 3/22/18

New Course(s)

SPTH 3020. School-Age Language and Literacy Disorders. This course addresses the relationship among language, literacy, and academic functioning in school-age children (ages 5 - 21 years) with typical and disordered language.  Students will examine assessment and intervention strategies for school-age children and adolescents within the school system including language influences for diverse speakers and clinically significant etiologies. Prerequisite: SPTH 3010 ; (3, Sp)

Approved by Academic Council on 3/22/18

SPTH 4580. Acquired Disorders. This course covers the underlying neuroanatomy and basic treatment techniques of neurogenic communication disorders, including aphasia, motor speech disorders, traumatic brain injury, cognitive communication disorders, right hemisphere disorders and dysphagia. Prerequisite: At least twelve semester hours of speech pathology courses or permission of instructor (3, Sp).

Approved by Academic Council on 3/22/18

Theology

New Course(s)

THEO 3025 (ENGL 3025, PHIL 3025). The Ideal Society. This is an interdisciplinary course which employs humanistic methods to explore religious, philosophical and literary conceptions of an ideal society. Students will use literary works to inspire and imagine their own model of an ideal society, while learning to justify its values and structures rationally and with recourse to theological reflection.  Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1010 ; Three Semester Hours in Philosophy (No Theology prerequisites) (3, EXP)

Approved by Academic Council on10/3/17

THEO 3666 (ENGL 3666). The Devil in Sacred and Secular Literature. This course examines the theological and literary origins and evolution of the portrayal of the devil, from God’s prosecuting attorney in the Hebrew Bible to later portrayals as a monster of scientific creation. Students will explore how the character of the devil and the problem of evil impact a just and humane society by studying sacred texts from around the globe, including but not limited to the Hebrew Bible, the New Testament, and the Koran, as well as secular literature including but not limited to such texts as Dante’s Inferno, Marlowe’s Dr. Faustus, Milton’s Paradise Lost, and Defoe’s Political History of the Devil. (3, EXP)

Approved by Academic Council on10/3/17

Xavier Core (XCOR)

New Course(s)

XCOR 1000 College Experience. XCOR 1000 serves as a foundation for the Xavier academic experience. This course aids in the transition to college life by encouraging students to build connections with faculty, staff, and other students in the university community, and to focus on the skills needed for success at Xavier. Students learn about key components of the Xavier support system available to them,become more engaged with our distinct mission, and begin to reflect on their role in becoming more engaged citizens. XCOR 1000 introduces students to Xavier’s unique Core Curriculum and helps them discover strategies to construct individualized academic pathways. NOTE: Instructors develop their own unique courses, based on a common course syllabus and a shared reading, from which individual syllabi will be built. (1)

Approved by Academic Council on 11/28/17

XCOR 1011 Xavier Experience. Xavier Experience challenges students to think deeply about the meaning of a just and humane society while fostering the development of critical thinking skills, oral and written communication skills, and socially responsible and ethical principles. This course introduces Xavier students to college-level inquiry through engagement with broad issues or questions. Each unique Xavier Experience Seminar is designed by faculty, but must include foundations in Xavier’s mission as well as our identity as a Catholic and historically Black institution.
Prerequisite(s): XCOR 1000 and ENGL 1000  /ENGL 1010  (3)

Approved by Academic Council on 11/28/17

XCOR 1012 New Orleans Experience. New Orleans Experience invites students to select a course from an array of topics emphasizing the diverse cultures, environments, and institutions of the New Orleans metropolitan community and Southeast Louisiana. While the city and region serve as text and subject of inquiry, each unique New Orleans Experience course is designed by faculty to increase student engagement and to enhance critical thinking, oral communication, and written communication skills. Prerequisites: XCOR 1000 and ENGL 1000  /ENGL 1010  (3)

Approved by Academic Council on 11/28/17

XCOR 3010 Engaging the Mission. Courses approved in this category challenge students to think more deeply about ideas, practices, and values that align with Xavier’s mission and reinforce critical thinking, as well as oral and written communication skills. Students learn to integrate diverse perspectives with a breadth and depth of knowledge, while also utilizing different, methodologies to find solutions to complex problems. Students choose from a variety of unique seminar topics developed by faculty and organized around different “big ideas.” Service learning courses are encouraged. Prerequisite(s): XCOR 1011/1012 and completed at least 60 hrs. (3)

Approved by Academic Council on 11/28/17

XCOR 3020 Engaging Global Issues. Courses approved in this category challenge students to explore particular social, cultural, economic, or political issues of global significance, and reinforce critical thinking, as well as oral and written communication skills. Students learn to integrate diverse perspectives with a breadth and depth of knowledge, while also utilizing different, methodologies to find solutions to complex problems. Students choose from a variety of unique seminar topics developed by faculty and organized around different “big ideas.” International study courses are encouraged. Students who earn at least 12 hrs. in an international study abroad program receive exemption from the Engaging Global Issues requirement. Prerequisite(s): XCOR 1011/1012 and completed at least 60 hrs (3)

Approved by Academic Council on 11/28/17

XCOR 3010 (PHIL 3015). Aristotle in New Orleans. This course combines traditional classroom learning and service learning.  The course is designed around Aristotle’s insight that action and philosophical reflection must inform one another if we are to properly understand ourselves and live well.  In the classroom, students will study writings by Aristotle and others on the nature of rhetoric, argument, education, and virtue.  Students will also learn the fundamentals of formal debate.  Outside the classroom, students will participate in a seven week service learning project that involves coaching New Orleans middle school debate teams.  Prerequisite(s): XCOR 1011 or 1012; completion of at least 60 hrs. (3)

Approved by Academic Council on 4/4/18